Surmortalité des enfants dans les quartiers informels de Ouagadougou: effet de composition ou effet de contexte ?

TitreSurmortalité des enfants dans les quartiers informels de Ouagadougou: effet de composition ou effet de contexte ?
Type de publicationJournal Article
Year of Publication2016
AuteursLankoandé, B, Soura, A, Millogo, R, Compaoré, Y, Rossier, C
JournalAfrican Population Studies
Volume30
Nombre1
Pagination2192–2202
ISSN2308-7854
Mots-clésAfrique sub-saharienne, Mortalité des enfants, Observatoire, Ouagadougou, Quartiers informels
Résumé

En Afrique sub-saharienne, les auteurs cherchant à expliquer la surmortalité des enfants des quartiers informels ont rarement essayé de dissocier les caractéristiques sociodémographiques des parents, d’une part, et les effets de contexte, d’autre part, en utilisant une définition « locale » de ces quartiers. Le différentiel de mortalité entre les quartiers formels et informels de la capitale du Burkina Faso est analysé ici à l’aide des données de l’Observatoire de Population de Ouagadougou. Les analyses reposent sur le calcul des taux de mortalité, et sur le modèle de régression de Cox. Au-delà des effets de l’instruction de la mère, de l’âge de la mère, et du niveau de vie du ménage, la résidence dans les quartiers informels est positivement associée à la mortalité des enfants. L’amélioration des conditions sanitaires dans ces quartiers, et un meilleur accès aux services de santé sont deux préalables à la baisse de la mortalité des enfants.

URLhttp://aps.journals.ac.za/pub/article/view/800
DOI10.11564/30-1-800
Short TitleSurmortalité des enfants dans les quartiers informels de Ouagadougou

Abortion incidence between 1990 and 2014: global, regional, and subregional levels and trends

TitreAbortion incidence between 1990 and 2014: global, regional, and subregional levels and trends
Type de publicationJournal Article
Year of Publication2016
AuteursSedgh, G, Bearak, J, Singh, S, Bankole, A, Popinchalk, A, Ganatra, B, Rossier, C, Gerdts, C, Tunçalp, Ö, Johnson, BRonald, Johnston, HBart, Alkema, L
JournalThe Lancet
Volume388
Nombre10041
Pagination258–267
ISSN0140-6736, 1474-547X
Résumé

Background: Information about the incidence of induced abortion is needed to motivate and inform efforts to help women avoid unintended pregnancies and to monitor progress toward that end. We estimate subregional, regional, and global levels and trends in abortion incidence for 1990 to 2014, and abortion rates in subgroups of women. We use the results to estimate the proportion of pregnancies that end in abortion and examine whether abortion rates vary in countries grouped by the legal status of abortion. Methods: We requested abortion data from government agencies and compiled data from international sources and nationally representative studies. With data for 1069 country-years, we estimated incidence using a Bayesian hierarchical time series model whereby the overall abortion rate is a function of the modelled rates in subgroups of women of reproductive age defined by their marital status and contraceptive need and use, and the sizes of these subgroups. Findings: We estimated that 35 abortions (90% uncertainty interval [UI] 33 to 44) occurred annually per 1000 women aged 15–44 years worldwide in 2010–14, which was 5 points less than 40 (39–48) in 1990–94 (90% UI for decline –11 to 0). Because of population growth, the annual number of abortions worldwide increased by 5·9 million (90% UI –1·3 to 15·4), from 50·4 million in 1990–94 (48·6 to 59·9) to 56·3 million (52·4 to 70·0) in 2010–14. In the developed world, the abortion rate declined 19 points (–26 to –14), from 46 (41 to 59) to 27 (24 to 37). In the developing world, we found a non-significant 2 point decline (90% UI –9 to 4) in the rate from 39 (37 to 47) to 37 (34 to 46). Some 25% (90% UI 23 to 29) of pregnancies ended in abortion in 2010–14. Globally, 73% (90% UI 59 to 82) of abortions were obtained by married women in 2010–14 compared with 27% (18 to 41) obtained by unmarried women. We did not observe an association between the abortion rates for 2010–14 and the grounds under which abortion is legally allowed. Interpretation: Abortion rates have declined significantly since 1990 in the developed world but not in the developing world. Ensuring access to sexual and reproductive health care could help millions of women avoid unintended
pregnancies and ensure access to safe abortion.

URLhttps://www.thelancet.com/journals/lancet/article/PIIS0140-6736(16)30380-4/abstract
DOI10.1016/S0140-6736(16)30380-4
Short TitleAbortion incidence between 1990 and 2014

Mental health and urban living in sub-Saharan Africa: major depressive episodes among the urban poor in Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso

TitreMental health and urban living in sub-Saharan Africa: major depressive episodes among the urban poor in Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso
Type de publicationJournal Article
Year of Publication2016
AuteursDuthé, G, Rossier, C, Bonnet, D, Soura, ABassiahi, Corker, J
JournalPopulation Health Metrics
Volume14
Nombre18
ISSN1478-7954
Mots-clésHealth and Demographic Surveillance System (HDSS), Major depressive disorder, mental health, Sub-Saharan Africa, Urban health
Résumé

In sub-Saharan African cities, the epidemiological transition has shifted a greater proportion of the burden of non-communicable diseases, including mental and behavioral disorder, to the adult population. The burden of major depressive disorder and its social risk factors in the urban sub-Saharan African population are not well understood and estimates vary widely. We conducted a study in Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso, in order to estimate the prevalence of major depressive episodes among adults in this urban setting.

URLhttps://doi.org/10.1186/s12963-016-0084-2
DOI10.1186/s12963-016-0084-2
Short TitleMental health and urban living in sub-Saharan Africa

Contemporary use of traditional contraception in sub-Saharan Africa

TitreContemporary use of traditional contraception in sub-Saharan Africa
Type de publicationJournal Article
Year of Publication2017
AuteursRossier, C, Corker, J
JournalPopulation and Development Review
Volume43
NombreS1
Pagination192–215
ISSN1728-4457
URLhttps://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/padr.12008
DOI10.1111/padr.12008

Introduction

TitreIntroduction
Type de publicationBook Chapter
Year of Publication2018
AuteursTillman, R, Voorpostel, M, Farago, P
ÉditeurTillman, R, Voorpostel, M, Farago, P
Book TitleSocial dynamics in Swiss society: Empirical studies based on the Swiss Household Panel
Volume9
Paginationix–xiii
PublisherSpringer
Place PublishedCham, Switzerland
ISBN Number978-3-319-89556-7
URLhttps://link.springer.com/book/10.1007%2F978-3-319-89557-4

The (un)healthy migrant effect. The role of legal status and naturalization timing

TitreThe (un)healthy migrant effect. The role of legal status and naturalization timing
Type de publicationBook Chapter
Year of Publication2018
AuteursPotarca, G, Bernardi, L
ÉditeurTillman, R, Voorpostel, M, Farago, P
Book TitleSocial Dynamics in Swiss Society
Series TitleLife Course Research and Social Policies
Chapter6
Pagination79–93
PublisherSpringer
Place PublishedCham, Switzerland
ISBN Number978-3-319-89556-7 978-3-319-89557-4
Résumé

The current evidence on immigrant health in Europe is mixed, with some studies indicating a healthy migrant effect, and others pointing out that immigrants experience worse health outcomes compared to natives. Very few studies however have investigated the potential existence of a migrant health paradox in Switzerland, a country with one of the highest shares of both foreign- and native-born immigrants in Europe, as well as a restrictive and increasingly negative immigration context. Research is also yet to assess the role played by legal status, particularly the acquisition of Swiss citizenship and the life course stage at which it occurs, in moderating the health gradient between natives and immigrants. In this chapter, we use data from the Swiss Household Panel (1999–2014) and a sample of 10,010 respondents between 18 and 60 years old at the time of entry into the panel, to perform multilevel logistic models of self-rated health. Results do not show a migrant health paradox. Migrants display worse health than natives, even after adjusting for differences in socio-economic status. Furthermore, legal status has a significant influence on the health disparities between Swiss natives and immigrants. Whereas immigrants that hold Swiss nationality since birth or those who were naturalized early in life are not significantly different in health compared to natives, immigrants who are not naturalized or were naturalised later in life display worse health than natives.

URLhttps://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-3-319-89557-4_6
DOI10.1007/978-3-319-89557-4_6

Global, regional, and subregional classification of abortions by safety, 2010–14: estimates from a Bayesian hierarchical model

TitreGlobal, regional, and subregional classification of abortions by safety, 2010–14: estimates from a Bayesian hierarchical model
Type de publicationJournal Article
Year of Publication2017
AuteursGanatra, B, Gerdts, C, Rossier, C, Johnson, BRonald, Tunçalp, Ö, Assifi, A, Sedgh, G, Singh, S, Bankole, A, Popinchalk, A, Bearak, J, Kang, Z, Alkema, L
JournalThe Lancet
Volume390
Nombre10110
Pagination2372–2381
ISSN0140-6736, 1474-547X
Résumé

Background: Global estimates of unsafe abortions have been produced for 1995, 2003, and 2008. However, reconceptualisation of the framework and methods for estimating abortion safety is needed owing to the increased availability of simple methods for safe abortion (eg, medical abortion), the increasingly widespread use of misoprostol outside formal health systems in contexts where abortion is legally restricted, and the need to account for the multiple factors that affect abortion safety. Methods: We used all available empirical data on abortion methods, providers, and settings, and factors affecting safety as covariates within a Bayesian hierarchical model to estimate the global, regional, and subregional distributions of abortion by safety categories. We used a three-tiered categorisation based on the WHO definition of unsafe abortion and WHO guidelines on safe abortion to categorise abortions as safe or unsafe and to further divide unsafe abortions into two categories of less safe and least safe. Findings: Of the 55.7 million abortions that occurred worldwide each year between 2010–14, we estimated that 30.6 million (54.9%, 90% uncertainty interval 49.9–59.4) were safe, 17.1 million (30.7%, 25.5–35.6) were less safe, and 8.0 million (14.4%, 11.5–18.1) were least safe. Thus, 25.1 million (45.1%, 40.6–50.1) abortions each year between 2010 and 2014 were unsafe, with 24.3 million (97%) of these in developing countries. The proportion of unsafe abortions was significantly higher in developing countries than developed countries (49.5% vs 12.5%). When grouped by the legal status of abortion, the proportion of unsafe abortions was significantly higher in countries with highly restrictive abortion laws than in those with less restrictive laws. Interpretation: Increased efforts are needed, especially in developing countries, to ensure access to safe abortion. The paucity of empirical data is a limitation of these findings. Improved in-country data for health services and innovative research to address these gaps are needed to improve future estimates.

URLhttps://www.thelancet.com/journals/lancet/article/PIIS0140-6736(17)31794-4/abstract
DOI10.1016/S0140-6736(17)31794-4
Short TitleGlobal, regional, and subregional classification of abortions by safety, 2010–14
Identifiant (ID) PubMed28964589

Developing a forward-looking agenda and methodologies for research of self-use of medical abortion

TitreDeveloping a forward-looking agenda and methodologies for research of self-use of medical abortion
Type de publicationJournal Article
Year of Publication2018
AuteursKapp, N, Blanchard, K, Coast, E, Ganatra, B, Harries, J, Footman, K, Moore, A, Owolabi, O, Rossier, C, Shellenberg, K, Wahlin, B, Woodsong, C
JournalContraception
Volume97
Nombre2
Pagination184–188
ISSN00107824
Mots-clésearly medical abortion, Medical abortion self-use, non-prescription medical abortion, research gaps
URLhttp://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0010782417304390
DOI10.1016/j.contraception.2017.09.007

Involving male partners in maternity care in Burkina Faso: a randomized controlled trial

TitreInvolving male partners in maternity care in Burkina Faso: a randomized controlled trial
Type de publicationJournal Article
Year of Publication2018
AuteursDaniele, M, Ganaba, R, Sarrassat, S, Cousens, S, Rossier, C, Drabo, S, Ouedraogo, D, Filippi, V
JournalBulletin of the World Health Organization
Volume96
Nombre7
Pagination450–461
ISSN0042-9686
Résumé

Objective: To determine whether an intervention to involve the male partners of pregnant women in maternity care influenced care-seeking, healthy breastfeeding and contraceptive practices after childbirth in urban Burkina Faso. Methods: In a non-blinded, multicentre, parallel-group, superiority trial, 1144 women were assigned by simple randomization to two study arms: 583 entered the intervention arm and 561 entered the control arm. All women were cohabiting with a male partner and had a low-risk pregnancy. Recruitment took place at 20 to 36 weeks’ gestation at five primary health centres in Bobo-Dioulasso. The intervention comprised three educational sessions: (i) an interactive group session during pregnancy with male partners only, to discuss their role; (ii) a counselling session during pregnancy for individual couples; and (iii) a postnatal couple counselling session. The control group received routine care only. We followed up participants at 3 and 8 months postpartum. Findings: The follow-up rate was over 96% at both times. In the intervention arm, 74% (432/583) of couples or men attended at least two study sessions. Attendance at two or more outpatient postnatal care consultations was more frequent in the intervention than the control group (risk difference, RD: 11.7%; 95% confidence interval, CI: 6.0 to 17.5), as was exclusive breastfeeding 3 months postpartum (RD: 11.4%; 95% CI: 5.8 to 17.2) and effective modern contraception use 8 months postpartum (RD: 6.4%; 95% CI: 0.5 to 12.3). Conclusion: Involving men as supportive partners in maternity care was associated with better adherence to recommended healthy practices after childbirth.

URLhttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6022615/
DOI10.2471/BLT.17.206466
Short TitleInvolving male partners in maternity care in Burkina Faso
Identifiant (ID) PubMed29962548

Relationship between perceived organizational support, proactive personality, and perceived employability in workers over 50

TitreRelationship between perceived organizational support, proactive personality, and perceived employability in workers over 50
Type de publicationJournal Article
Year of Publication2018
AuteursGuilbert, L, Carrein, C, Guénolé, N, Monfray, L, Rossier, J, Priolo, D
JournalJournal of Employment Counseling
Volume55
Nombre2
Pagination58–71
ISSN2161-1920
Mots-clésperceived employability, perceived organizational support, proactive personality, workers over 50
Résumé

This article examines the relationship between perceived organizational support, proactive personality, and perceived employability in a sample of workers over 50. An online questionnaire assessing these variables were filled by 213 employees. Results confirmed that individual dispositions have a significant impact on perceived employability but also indicated that organizational context may have a greater impact on employability. The implications of the findings are discussed, and suggestions are offered for future research on employability.

URLhttps://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1002/joec.12075
DOI10.1002/joec.12075

Investigating the link between trait emotional intelligence, career indecision, and self-perceived employability: The role of career adaptability

TitreInvestigating the link between trait emotional intelligence, career indecision, and self-perceived employability: The role of career adaptability
Type de publicationJournal Article
Year of Publication2018
AuteursUdayar, S, Fiori, M, Thalmayer, AGayle, Rossier, J
JournalPersonality and Individual Differences
Volume135
Pagination7–12
ISSN0191-8869
Mots-cléscareer adaptability, Career decision-making, mediation, Self-perceived employability, Trait emotional intelligence
Résumé

Trait emotional intelligence (TEI) is emerging as a useful and promising individual difference in predicting vocational behavior (e.g., Di Fabio & Saklofske, 2014). Little is yet known about the underlying processes that may lead TEI to associate with career related outcomes. This study investigates the role of career adaptability in mediating the association between TEI and career decision-making difficulties and self-perceived employability, in a sample of Swiss university students (N = 400). The results of a series of path analysis in which we controlled for intelligence, sex and personality showed that career adaptability fully mediated the effect of TEI on self-perceived employability and career decision-making difficulties, in particular the subscales of lack of information and inconsistent information. Our findings shed light on the role of regulatory processes in shaping the effects of TEI on career-related outcomes.

URLhttp://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0191886918303787
DOI10.1016/j.paid.2018.06.046
Short TitleInvestigating the link between trait emotional intelligence, career indecision, and self-perceived employability

Exploring differences in well-being across occupation type and skill.

TitreExploring differences in well-being across occupation type and skill.
Type de publicationJournal Article
Year of Publication2018
AuteursHofmann, J, Gander, F, Ruch, W
JournalTranslational Issues in Psychological Science
Volume4
Nombre3
Pagination290–303
ISSN2332-2179, 2332-2136
Mots-clésengagement, life satisfaction, meaning, occupation, orientations to happiness
Résumé

This article could show that the three orientations to happiness predict life satisfaction in all types of jobs. Thus, the orientations to happiness may be used for interventions aiming at increasing well-being in the workplace. It is suggested that in low skill level occupations, engagement and meaning should be increased, while for high skill occupations, no differences in the orientations to happiness were identified. Thus, all orientations may be trained with an equal focus in order to achieve a “full life” and increase well-being in the workplace.

URLhttp://doi.apa.org/getdoi.cfm?doi=10.1037/tps0000167
DOI10.1037/tps0000167

Precariousness profile and career adaptability as determinants of job insecurity: A three-wave study

TitrePrecariousness profile and career adaptability as determinants of job insecurity: A three-wave study
Type de publicationJournal Article
Year of Publication2018
AuteursUrbanaviciute, I, Udayar, S, Maggiori, C, Rossier, J
JournalJournal of Career Development
Mots-cléscareer adaptability, employability, job insecurity, labor market precariousness
Résumé

The present study compares the mean levels and growth in job insecurity across employees’ precariousness profiles as defined by a combination of perceived employability and financial difficulties. Drawing on the labor market precariousness and workplace stress literature, we hypothesized that employees with the most precarious profile would report elevated levels of job insecurity followed by a growth trend. Moreover, career adaptability was expected to act as a resource for counteracting job insecurity. The study was based on three waves of a longitudinal “Professional Paths” survey (National Centre of Competence in Research LIVES) conducted in Switzerland. The data of 799 professionally active adults were analyzed using latent growth modeling. In line with our hypothesis, the findings showed the highest levels of job insecurity and the most pronounced growth trend among employees with the precarious profile. Interestingly, different career adaptability facets played differing roles in predicting job insecurity, potentially revealing some of its under-researched aspects.

URLhttp://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/0894845318791777
DOI10.1177/0894845318791777
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Short TitlePrecariousness profile and career adaptability as determinants of job insecurity

European research agenda for career guidance and counselling

TitreEuropean research agenda for career guidance and counselling
Type de publicationBook Chapter
Year of Publication2018
AuteursWeber, PC, Katsarov, J, Cohen-Scali, V, Mulvey, R, Nota, L, Rossier, J, Thomsen, R
ÉditeurCohen-Scali, V, Rossier, J, Nota, L
Book TitleNew perspectives on career counseling and guidance in Europe
Pagination219–250
PublisherSpringer International Publishing
Place PublishedCham, Switzerland
ISBN Number978-3-319-61475-5 978-3-319-61476-2
Mots-clésCareer Counselling, Career Guidance, Career Practice, Career Profession, literature review, Research Agenda
Résumé

In a changing world, there is a need to reflect about the research basis of career guidance and counselling (CGC) as a professional practice, considering the contributions of various disciplines and research traditions. This paper outlines a possible European research agenda (ERA) to further enhance the knowledge foundation of the CGC practice. The proposed lines of research, which are pronounced in the ERA, are based on a literature review involving 45 researchers concerned with the CGC practice. At three events, approximately 150 researchers from across Europe were engaged in the discussion, what kind of research is needed to enhance the knowledge foundation of the CGC practice. The paper provides a systematic overview of the relevant research fields, and links key research questions to current research endeavours. Due to the necessary
involvement of diverse types of practitioners, policy makers, and researchers from different disciplines to share the CGC practice and contribute to the development of its knowledge basis, the paper calls for open, cooperative and integrative research approaches, including the combination of different research paradigms and methods. The development of the European Research Agenda was co-funded by the European Union through the Lifelong Learning Programme.

URLhttp://link.springer.com/10.1007/978-3-319-61476-2_14
DOI10.1007/978-3-319-61476-2_14

Perceived social support and Big Five personality traits in middle adulthood: A 4-year cross-lagged path analysis

TitrePerceived social support and Big Five personality traits in middle adulthood: A 4-year cross-lagged path analysis
Type de publicationJournal Article
Year of Publication2019
AuteursUdayar, S, Urbanaviciute, I, Rossier, J
JournalApplied Research in Quality of Life
Mots-clésBig five, Middle adulthood, Perceived social support, Personality traits
Résumé

Previous studies have shown that the Big Five personality traits are significantly associated with perceived social support and these associations are positively associated with agreeableness, extraversion, and emotional stability. However, it is not yet clear whether these associations hold longitudinally or how these variables may predict each other over time. To investigate the co-development of personality traits and perceived social support, a cross-lagged path model design was used on a sample of adults (N = 1309) measured on two occasions 4 years apart. The results indicated that while emotional stability predicted perceived social support 4 years later, perceived social support also predicted emotional stability, extraversion, agreeableness, openness, and conscientiousness 4 years later. Our findings suggest that perceived social support may be a resource that has an impact on the development of personality traits known to be associated with social skills as well as the quality and frequency of social interactions in middle adulthood.

URLhttps://doi.org/10.1007/s11482-018-9694-0
DOI10.1007/s11482-018-9694-0
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Short TitlePerceived social support and Big Five personality traits in middle adulthood

Character strengths – stability, change, and relationships with well-being changes

TitreCharacter strengths – stability, change, and relationships with well-being changes
Type de publicationJournal Article
Year of Publication2019
AuteursGander, F, Hofmann, J, Proyer, RT, Ruch, W
JournalApplied Research in Quality of Life
Résumé

Character strengths are positively valued personality traits that are assumed to be stable across time and situations, but also malleable due to cultivation or deliberate intervention. Also, studies showed that character strengths are robustly related to well-being. Consequently, character strengths have often been used in interventions aimed at increasing well-being. However, the stability of character strengths and the longitudinal relationships with wellbeing are widely unexplored: First, previous reports on the stability of character strengths have mainly focused on one assessment instrument only and second, they did not consider other indicators of stability (and malleability) besides rank-order stability, (i.e., mean-level stability). In this longitudinal study, we assessed character strengths and well-being at two time points and examined the stability and malleability of character strengths and the convergence of changes in character strengths and well-being by means of correlation analyses. Two samples (n1 = 601, n2 = 1162) completed different measures of character strengths and instruments for the assessment of well-being, illbeing, and health within up to three and a half years. Results showed that character strengths are stable over longer time periods (test-retest reliabilities ranging from rtt = .60–.83) and that relationships between changes in strengths and well-being are highly parallel to what has been reported in cross-sectional studies (strongest relationships for zest, hope, curiosity, and love). Furthermore, results suggest that some strengths, most predominantly humor, but also spirituality and prudence might be more amenable for change than others. These results might bear important information for selecting character strengths in interventions.

URLhttps://doi.org/10.1007/s11482-018-9690-4
DOI10.1007/s11482-018-9690-4
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Evidence-based practice in career and workforce development interventions

TitreEvidence-based practice in career and workforce development interventions
Type de publicationBook Chapter
Year of Publication2017
AuteursWhiston, SC, Rossier, J, Barón, PMHernande
ÉditeurSolberg, S, Ali, SRasheed
Book TitleThe handbook of career and workforce development: Research, practice, and policy
Chapter3
Pagination39–56
PublisherRoutledge/Taylor & Francis Group
Place PublishedNew York, NY
Résumé

This chapter summarizes the scientific foundation for career and workforce development interventions with the intent of providing insight into what constitutes evidence-based career interventions. Spokane and Oliver (1983) defined “vocational interventions” as any treatment or effort intended to enhance an individual’s career development or to enable the person to make better career-related decisions. We have a similar definition of career and workforce development interventions, which is any treatment or effort intended to enhance an individual’s career, occupational, or work-related development, or to enable the person to make better work-related decisions and help the individual to manage work transitions. This is a broad definition that encompasses a wide array of interventions, such as individual counseling, group activities, career classes, computer information systems, and self-help interventions.

URLhttps://www.routledgehandbooks.com/doi/10.4324/9781315714769.ch3

Vocational interests and career indecision in Switzerland and Burkina Faso: Cross-cultural similarities and differences

TitreVocational interests and career indecision in Switzerland and Burkina Faso: Cross-cultural similarities and differences
Type de publicationJournal Article
Year of Publication2018
AuteursAtitsogbe, KA, Moumoula, IA, Rochat, S, Antonietti, J-P, Rossier, J
JournalJournal of Vocational Behavior
Volume107
Pagination126–140
ISSN00018791
Mots-cléscareer decision-making difficulties, Career indecision, Cross-cultural psychology, Personal Globe Inventory, Questionnaire, vocational interests
Résumé

The Personal Globe Inventory (PGI) and the Career Decision-Making Difficulties Questionnaire (CDDQ) have been adapted to be used in various languages and cultural contexts. However, French versions of these instruments have never been used in Africa and only very few studies have formally studied their cross-cultural replicability. Moreover, no studies have analyzed if the relationship between career interests and decision-making difficulties might be stable across cultures. For this reason, 413 Swiss students and adult workers and 287 Burkinabe students completed both the PGI and the CDDQ. Randomization tests and a series of confirmatory factor analyses supported the structural validity and replicability across the two countries of both the PGI and the CDDQ. Although CDDQ's scales reached scalar invariance across cultures, this was not the case for the scales of the PGI, which reached only metric invariance, suggesting that country-specific norms should be used for this inventory. However, both instruments reached scalar invariance with regard to gender. Gender differences were larger for interests than for career decision-making difficulties within each country sample. Finally, the associations between vocational interests and the CDDQ were small and significant in some cases only in Switzerland. Overall, this study shows that the structure of vocational interests and career indecision seem to replicate well across very different cultures.

URLhttps://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0001879118300423
DOI10.1016/j.jvb.2018.04.002
Short TitleVocational interests and career indecision in Switzerland and Burkina Faso

New perspectives on career counseling and guidance in Europe : Building careers in changing and diverse societies

TitreNew perspectives on career counseling and guidance in Europe : Building careers in changing and diverse societies
Type de publicationBook
Year of Publication2018
Series EditorCohen-Scali, V, Rossier, J, Nota, L
PublisherSpringer International Publishing
Place PublishedCham, Switzerland
ISBN Number978-3-319-61475-5
Résumé

In industrialized societies, individuals are facing major challenges that mobilize many of their psychological and social resources. The world of work is changing constantly. Adults have to adapt their technical skills and knowledge continuously. For teenagers and young adults, choosing a vocation and constructing their future career paths is becoming increasingly difficult. The migration of people and the globalization of the workforce raise questions about social inclusion and the future of affected individuals. These examples highlight of the importance of the field of Career Counseling and Guidance to support citizens individually and collectively in building their future. The challenges our societies face demonstrate how crucial the development of research in this field is.The European Doctoral Programme in Career Guidance and Counselling (ECADOC), funded by the European Commission from 2013-2016, has brought together PhD students working on burning issues in this field, using various theoretical references and methodologies. The four parts of this book present a selection of innovative research aiming to find answers to the named challenges. Part 1 deals with key psychological processes involved in career construction of young adults. Part 2 presents research concerning transitions over the course of life. Part 3 covers research related to interventions of career guidance and counseling. Part 4 outlines perspectives for the future and proposes a European Research Agenda for our field of research. Perspectives on Current Research in Career Guidance and Counseling – Building Careers in Changing and Diverse Societies is dedicated to students, researchers and practitioners in the fields of education, career guidance, psychology, human resource management to inform them about very recent work and promote the development of innovative interventions and programmes.

URLhttps://www.springer.com/de/book/9783319614755
Short TitleNew perspectives on career counseling and guidance in Europe

Danièle Linhart, la comédie humaine du travail, de la déshumanisation taylorienne à la sur-humanisation managériale

TitreDanièle Linhart, la comédie humaine du travail, de la déshumanisation taylorienne à la sur-humanisation managériale
Type de publicationJournal Article
Year of Publication2018
AuteursLe Goff, IBoni-
JournalTravail, genre et sociétés
Volume39
Pagination240–244
ISSN1294-6303
URLhttps://www.cairn.info/revue-travail-genre-et-societes-2018-1-page-240.htm
DOI10.3917/tgs.039.0240

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