Family salience across nations: Configurations of morphological conditions

TitreFamily salience across nations: Configurations of morphological conditions
Type de publicationBook Chapter
Year of Publication2017
AuteursGanjour, O, Widmer, E
Book TitleFamily continuity and change
Series TitlePalgrave Macmillan Studies in Family and Intimate Life
EditionFirst
Pagination33-59
PublisherPalgrave Macmillan
Place PublishedLondon, United Kingdom
Mots-clésFamily change
Résumé

Family change across societies is a complex issue that raised considerable debates throughout the 1950s and 1960s. Particular attention was given at the time to the unequal pace of family change according to countries or regions in the world, with a hypothesized similar turn to the dominance of the nuclear family in all national contexts, Western or non- Western (e.g., Goode 1963). Since then, family sociology has rebuffed the nuclearization thesis and has, to the contrary, stressed historical trends of family pluralization away from the nuclear family that are present in all Western nations (Lesthaeghe 1995)

Citation Key3078
Refereed DesignationRefereed

Conclusion

TitreConclusion
Type de publicationBook Chapter
Year of Publication2017
AuteursCesnuityté, V, Lück, D, Widmer, E
Book TitleFamily continuity and change
Series TitlePalgrave Macmillan Studies in Family and Intimate Life
EditionFirst
Pagination27-31
PublisherPalgrave Macmillan
Place PublishedLondon, United Kingdom
Résumé

This chapter has set out three different approaches to the study of family life: practice theory, historical contextualization, and narrative analysis. The choice of approach, of course, will depend on which aspects of family life are of interest—the everyday or whether the focus is over long stretches of a life’s course or across family generations. In addition, time and place are important factors in any analysis. In relation to the micro routine or habitual aspects of family lives, I have pointed to social practice theories. It is obvious that the habitual aspects of people’s lives alter and are modified over time. Yet such behaviours are not easily subject to recall or reflection by their practitioners and are therefore among the most difficult for researchers to study.

Citation Key3077
Refereed DesignationRefereed

Introduction

TitreIntroduction
Type de publicationBook Chapter
Year of Publication2017
AuteursWidmer, E, Cesnuityté, V, Lück, D
Book TitleFamily continuity and change
Series TitlePalgrave Macmillan Studies in Family and Intimate Life
EditionFirst
Pagination1-5
PublisherPalgrave Macmillan
Place PublishedLondon, United Kingdom
Mots-clésFamily change
Résumé

The goal of this book is to present a variety of empirical research on continuity and family change within the European space, with respect to three dimensions: family understanding or theorizing, family transitions across its individual life course, and family practices. Researchers from nine European countries investigate families, their conceptualization, transitions, and practices between persisting needs and flowing circumstances, between holding on to traditional routines and adapting to a fast-changing socioeconomic environment, and between individual agency and social constraints.

Citation Key3076
Refereed DesignationRefereed

Family continuity and change

TitreFamily continuity and change
Type de publicationBook
Year of Publication2017
Series EditorWidmer, E, Cesnuityté, V, Lück, D
EditionFirst
PublisherPalgrave Macmillan
Place PublishedLondon, United Kingdom
Mots-clésFamily change, life course
Résumé

The goal of this book is to present a variety of empirical research on continuity and family change within the European space, with respect to three dimensions: family understanding or theorizing, family transitions across its individual life course, and family practices. Researchers from nine European countries investigate families, their conceptualization, transitions, and practices between persisting needs and flowing circumstances, between holding on to traditional routines and adapting to a fast-changing socioeconomic environment, and between individual agency and social constraints.

Citation Key3075
Refereed DesignationRefereed

Multidimensionality of well-being and spillover effects across life domains: How do parenthood and personality affect changes in domain-specific satisfaction?

TitreMultidimensionality of well-being and spillover effects across life domains: How do parenthood and personality affect changes in domain-specific satisfaction?
Type de publicationJournal Article
Year of Publication2017
AuteursBernardi, L, Bollmann, G, Potârcă, G, Rossier, J
JournalResearch in Human Development
Volume14
Pagination26-51
Résumé

Whether having children improves our well-being is a long-standing topic of debate. Demographic and sociological research has investigated changes in individuals’ overall well-being and partnership satis- faction when they become parents. However, little is known about how becoming parent may produce vulnerability—observable as an enduring decrease in well-being—in life domains that are strongly interdependent with the family domain, such as work and leisure. Linking life-course and personality psychology perspectives, the authors examine the trajectories of subjective well-being—measured as satisfaction with life, work, and leisure—3 years before and 3 years after the transition to parenthood. The authors particularly focus on the moderating effects of gender and personality. Using data from the German Socio-Economic Panel (1984–2013) and multilevel growth curve modeling, the authors show strong gender-based vulnerability in how people react to parenthood. Although men display a nonlinear pathway of decreasing life satisfaction and a stable trajectory of job satisfaction, women experience more changes in their satisfaction with work and more dramatic decreases in leisure satisfaction. Contrary to most of our expectations, the moderating effects of personality were modest. Extraversion influenced the trajectories of work satisfaction, whereas neuroticism and conscientiousness affected the pathway of leisure satisfaction for women only. This article shows that the transition to parenthood influences well- being trajectories in specific domains, and this influence differs between women and men.

DOI10.1080/15427609.2016.1268893
Citation Key3070
Refereed DesignationRefereed

Insight as a social identity process in the evolution of psychosocial functioning in the early phase of psychosis

TitreInsight as a social identity process in the evolution of psychosocial functioning in the early phase of psychosis
Type de publicationJournal Article
Year of Publication2017
AuteursKlaas, H, Clémence, A, Marion-Veyron, R, Antonietti, J-P, Alameda, L, Golay, P, Conus, P
JournalPsychological Medicine
Volume47
Pagination718-729
Date Publishedmar
Mots-clésEarly phase of psychosis, insight, schizophrenia, social functioning, social identity, TIPP
Résumé

Awareness of illness (insight) has been found to have contradictory effects for different functional outcomes after the early course of psychosis. Whereas it is related to psychotic symptom reduction and medication adherence, it is also associated with increased depressive symptoms. In this line, the specific effects of insight on the evolution of functioning over time have not been identified, and social indicators, such as socio-occupational functioning have barely been considered. Drawing from social identity theory we investigated the impact of insight on the development of psychosocial outcomes and the interactions of these variables over time. The participants, 240 patients in early phase of psychosis from the Treatment and Early Intervention in Psychosis Program (TIPP) of the University Hospital of Lausanne, Switzerland, were assessed at eight time points over 3 years. Cross-lagged panel analyses and multilevel analyses were conducted on socio-occupational and general functioning [Social and Occupational Functioning Assessment Scale (SOFAS) and Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF)] with insight, time and depressive symptoms as independent variables. Results from multilevel analyses point to an overall positive impact of insight on psychosocial functioning, which increases over time. Yet the cross-lagged panel analysis did not reveal a systematic positive and causal effect of insight on SOFAS and GAF scores. Depressive symptoms seem only to be relevant in the beginning of the treatment process. Our results point to a complex process in which the positive impact of insight on psychosocial functioning increases over time, even when considering depressive symptoms. Future studies and treatment approaches should consider the procedural aspect of insight.

DOI10.1017/S0033291716002506
Citation Key3079
Refereed DesignationRefereed

Ethnicity, authority and political participation: Expressing political attitudes in contexts of shifting ethnic salience

TitreEthnicity, authority and political participation: Expressing political attitudes in contexts of shifting ethnic salience
Type de publicationJournal Article
Year of Publication2017
AuteursBady, Z
JournalLIVES Working Paper
Volume59.2
Pagination45
PublisherNCCR LIVES
Mots-clésEthnicity, political participation, social representations, spiral of silence
Résumé

Since the second half of the twentieth century, ethnicity has come to play an increasingly important role in political phenomena, especially in the justification of armed conflicts. To explain this particular role that ethnic identities seem to play, recent research highlights the strategic mobilization of ethnic identities by elites to obtain and legitimize positions of power. Based on this work, this research aims to answer two main gaps that characterize quantitative studies on the subject and which prevent a better understanding of the role of ethnicity in the acceptance of leaders’ authority. First, quantitative research on ethnicity typically fails to take the social constructivist stance seriously as shown by the use of measurements (i.e. "fractionalization" or "polarization" indices) that treat ethnic identity as a descriptive characteristic, regardless of its subjective relevance for individuals. Second, research generally focuses on either the societal (national) level or the individual level when trying to understand the relationship between ethnicity and violence, and therefore confuses dynamics that happen at the national level with those occurring at more local scales. Relying on the spiral of silence theory and the social representation approach, I propose the following hypothesis to explain how strong leadership may become uncontested: local contexts where the importance of ethnic identities substantially changes are characterized by a questioning of the political norms (i.e. what political stances can be publicly enacted) and constitutes therefore places where otherwise censored political views (e.g. authoritarian) may come to dominate the public sphere. To test this hypothesis, I use data from the first two rounds of the Afrobarometer survey collected in 10 African countries. Using multilevel logistic models, I examine whether regional change in the salience of ethnic identities interacts with the political attitude of individuals (authoritarian vs Democrats) to predict their political participation. As hypothesized, results show that regional volatility selectively affects the enactment of political views. However, the pattern is more complex than predicted and suggests that the spiral of silence framework is be too simplistic to explain processes occurring in these contexts.

Citation Key2181

When development is not "right": Understanding the relationship between perceptions, collective action and victimhood

TitreWhen development is not "right": Understanding the relationship between perceptions, collective action and victimhood
Type de publicationJournal Article
Year of Publication2017
AuteursJayakody, S
Secondary AuthorsUsoof-Thowfeek, R
JournalLIVES Working Paper
Volume59.1
Pagination39
PublisherNCCR LIVES
Mots-cléscollective action, conflict, development, victim beliefs
Résumé

Much of the research on effective reconciliation advocates a holistic approach to social harmony in post war settings. However, many state and non-governmental entities choose physical infrastructure development, as a strategy for reconciliation believing that enhanced access to physical resources would dampen any recurrence of violence and conflict. At the end of 30 years of war between the Liberation Tigers of Tamil Ealem (LTTE) and the Sri Lankan military, the Sri Lankan government for several years after, took a similar path. This paper examines community and individual responses to such development, in post war Sri Lanka with special focus on community reactions to development in situations where development is perceived as imposed. The paper specifically examines how these responses relate to support for collective action and whether this relationship is mediated by different forms of victim beliefs that community members hold.
The paper uses data collected in a survey conducted in two districts in Sri Lanka from 202 respondents, representative of all ethnic and religious groups. The survey probed respondents on their own and community views of the development that had taken place in post war Sri Lanka, their beliefs about their group’s victimhood and their support and willingness to engage in collective action. The analysis revealed higher conflict exposure to be associated with higher tendencies to engage in collective action in the presence of certain types of victim beliefs. It revealed that lower receptiveness of development was positively related with collective action, but different types of victim beliefs mediated this relationship.

Citation Key2180

The Geography of Social Links Among a Young Cohort in Switzerland

TitreThe Geography of Social Links Among a Young Cohort in Switzerland
Type de publicationJournal Article
Year of Publication2017
AuteursBrändle, K
JournalLIVES Working Paper
Volume58
Pagination33
PublisherNCCR LIVES
Mots-clésFrequent contact networks, Geographical distance, Network spatial dispersion, social networks
Résumé

Small world theories and modern communication facilities convey the impression of a connected world where geographical boundaries have lost their importance and where everyone can reach everyone else in just a few steps, overcoming large geographical distances apparently with ease. Most studies on network processes, like, for instance, the accumulation of (dis)advantage in network clusters, focus on topological factors only, ignoring geography, while work on network geography often does not attempt to explain the large variance in link distance. This article analyses the geography of everyday links of a young cohort in Switzerland, integrating several levels of analysis: individual characteristics (micro-level), extended ego networks (intermediate level), and functional regions (aggregate or macro level). Our results show that everyday links are very close, and, for our young sample, get larger with age. Residential mobility shows an effect limited in time. However, distance of links is not only a personal, but also a network characteristic; some individual characteristics only have an effect when cumulated at the network level. An analysis of cross-regional links showed that social links among young people in Switzerland are heavily segregated by language and structured along canton borders, but also determined by the type of region of residence. Thus, while it is crucial to take geography into account when analyzing real-world social networks, link distance alone is not sufficient to render the complexity of social ties.

Citation Key2173

Does Vocational Education Give a Happy Start and a Lousy End to Careers?

TitreDoes Vocational Education Give a Happy Start and a Lousy End to Careers?
Type de publicationJournal Article
Year of Publication2016
AuteursKorber, M, Oesch, D
JournalLIVES Working Paper
Volume57
Pagination40
PublisherNCCR LIVES
Mots-clésapprenticeship, earnings, employment, life course, specific skills, Switzerland, vocational education and training
Résumé

Since the Great Recession, vocational training has been advocated as the solution against high youth unemployment. It gives workers a head start in the labor market and may thus lead to better careers. Yet vocational skills may also become obsolete sooner and leave older workers vulnerable to technological change. We address this issue by comparing earnings and employment over the life course for vocational and general education at the upper-secondary level. We do so for Switzerland, the OECD country with the highest share of youth undertaking vocational education and training (VET), using the Swiss Labor Force Survey 1991-2014 and the Swiss Household Panel. We find that employment prospects for older workers with VET are as good as those for workers with general education. However, general education is associated with higher earnings than VET once workers enter their thirties. There are strong gender differences: Among men, life-cycle earnings with VET exceed those of workers with general education, whereas among women, general education is associated with higher earnings.

Citation Key2153

Inequality of BMI Dynamics: A Socioeconomic and Gender Perspective

TitreInequality of BMI Dynamics: A Socioeconomic and Gender Perspective
Type de publicationJournal Article
Year of Publication2016
AuteursLipps, O, Zella, S
JournalLIVES Working Paper
Volume56
Pagination1-23
PublisherNCCR LIVES
Mots-clésage differences, fixed effects modeling, gender differences, Germany, SES and individual BMI, Switzerland, USA
Résumé

The aim is to understand causal effects of gender, socio-economic status, and ageing on body mass index (BMI) of individuals in three industrialized countries which are characterized by different BMI distributions.
Data comes from three large population representative panel surveys in the USA, Switzerland, and Germany including about 65 000 individuals and 254 000 measurements. Individuals report up to eleven times, measured annually (Switzerland) or bi-annually (USA and Germany). We use fixed effects models to interprete causal effects and random effects models to estimate coefficients of time invariant covariates. We find that not working increases BMI in the US and Germany, in women, and in lower educated individuals. A higher income increases BMI in men and in the US. Ageing is the driving force in all countries, in particular in Germany. Women increase their BMI faster than men, and the lower educated faster than those with a higher education. We conclude that the generally more deprived individuals (women, not working, lower educated, people from less affluent countries) suffer from a comparatively stronger BMI increase over their lifetime.

DOI10.12682/lives.2296-1658.2016.56
Citation Key2142

Treatment Versus Regime Effects of Carrots and Sticks

TitreTreatment Versus Regime Effects of Carrots and Sticks
Type de publicationJournal Article
Year of Publication2016
AuteursArni, P, van den Berg, G, Lalive, R
JournalLIVES Working Paper
Volume55
Pagination1-40
PublisherNCCR LIVES
Mots-clésactive labor market programs, caseworkers, earnings, employment, policy regime, treatment effect, unemployment
Résumé

Public Employment Service (PES) agencies and caseworkers (CW) often have substantial leeway in the design and implementation of active labor market policies (ALMP) for the unemployed, resulting in variation of usage. This paper presents a novel framework in which this variation is used for the joint assessment of different ways in which ALMP effects can operate. We examine an additional layer of impacts - beyond the treatment effects on the treated job seekers - called regime effects, which potentially affect all job seekers and which are defined by the extent to which programs are intended to be used in a market. We propose a novel method to jointly estimate regime effects for two types of programs, supportive (carrots) and restrictive (sticks) programs. We apply this to contrast regime and treatment effects on unemployment durations, employment, and post-unemployment earnings using register data that contain PES and caseworker identifiers for about 130,000 job seekers. The results show that “carrots” and “sticks” treatments prolong unemployment, but carrots increase earnings whereas sticks decrease them. We find regime effects of a similar order of magnitude. Higher intended usage of carrots and sticks reduces unemployment durations, but carrots raise earnings whereas sticks decrease them. We also find interaction effects between carrots and sticks policies. Regime effects are economically substantial. Our comprehensive cost-benefits analyses show that modest increases in the intended usage of carrots and sticks reduce the total cost of an unemployed individual by up to 10%.

DOI10.12682/lives.2296-1658.2016.55
Citation Key2141

Availability, cost or culture? Obstacles to Childcare Services for Low Income Families

TitreAvailability, cost or culture? Obstacles to Childcare Services for Low Income Families
Type de publicationJournal Article
Year of Publication2015
AuteursAbrassart, A, Bonoli, G
JournalJournal of Social Policy
Volume44
Ticket4
Pagination787-806
DOI10.1017/S0047279415000288
Citation Key2987
Refereed DesignationRefereed

Gender, education, and family life courses in East and West Germany: Insights from new sequence analysis techniques

TitreGender, education, and family life courses in East and West Germany: Insights from new sequence analysis techniques
Type de publicationJournal Article
Year of PublicationIn Press
AuteursStruffolino, E, Studer, M, Fasang, A
JournalAdvances in Life Course Research
PaginationAdvance online publication
Date Publisheddec
Mots-clésEast/West Germany, education, Family life course, gender, Implicative statistic for sequences of typical, Sequence discrepancy analysis, States analysis
Résumé

How do men and women's family life courses differ? Are gender differences in family life courses greater at higher or lower educational levels? And how does the intersection of gender, education and family life courses vary across different macro-structural contexts? This paper addresses these questions comparing East and West Germany during the German division (1961–1990). We thereby compare a strong male breadwinner model in a social market economy in West Germany and a universal breadwinner model in a state socialist system in the East. The analysis uses data from the German National Education Panel (NEPS) and employs two new sequence analysis tools: sequence discrepancy analysis and the implicative statistic for analyzing sequences of typical states. These tools enable us to scrutinize the degree, content, and timing of differences in family trajectories between men and women of different educational levels in the two sub-societies. In line with our expectations, family life courses were more de-standardized in the West compared to the East, and this occurred to the same extent for men and women in both contexts. While we find moderate gender differences in family life courses across all educational groups in the strong male breadwinner context in West Germany, for East Germany gender differences were significant among the medium and lower educated, but not among the highly educated. These findings underline the fact that the intersection of gender and education for family life courses is highly context-specific. They further suggest that different patterns of assortative mating play a key role for gender differences in family life courses. We demonstrate the added value of sequence discrepancy analysis and the implicative statistic to illuminate differences in longitudinal life courses between men and women or other social groups.

URLhttp://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1040260815000714
DOI10.1016/j.alcr.2015.12.001
Citation Key2231
Refereed DesignationRefereed

The association of timing of retirement with cognitive performance in old age: The role of leisure activities after retirement

TitreThe association of timing of retirement with cognitive performance in old age: The role of leisure activities after retirement
Type de publicationJournal Article
Year of PublicationIn Press
AuteursIhle, A, Grotz, C, Adam, S, Oris, M, Fagot, D, Gabriel, R, Kliegel, M
JournalInternational Psychogeriatrics
PaginationAdvance online publication
ISSN1741-203X
Mots-clésactivity engagement, cognitive functioning, cognitive level of occupation, cognitive reserve, cognitive stimulation, older adults, physical demand of job, timing of retirement
Résumé

Background: The role of timing of retirement on cognitive functioning in old age is inconclusive so far. Therefore, the present study set out to investigate the association of timing of retirement with cognitive performance and its interplay with key correlates of cognitive reserve in a large sample of older adults. Methods: Two thousand two hundred and sixty three older adults served as sample for the present study. Different psychometric tests (TMT A, TMT B, Mill Hill) were administered. In addition, individuals were interviewed on their retirement, occupation, educational attainment, and regarding 18 leisure activities that have been carried out after retirement. Results: Earlier retirement (compared to retirement at legal age) was significantly associated with better performance in the TMT A, the TMT B, and the Mill Hill vocabulary test. Moderation analyses showed that in individuals with a moderate number of leisure activities in old age, earlier retirement was related to better cognitive performance, but not in those with a relatively large number of leisure activities. Hierarchical regression analyses revealed that entering leisure activities as additional predictor significantly increased explained variance in the cognitive measures over and above all other investigated markers of cognitive reserve (i.e., occupation and education). Conclusions: Present data further corroborate the view that leisure activities even in old age may lead to further enrichment effects and thereby may be related to better cognitive functioning. The role of engaging in activities in the context of major life events such as retirement is discussed.

DOI10.1017/S1041610216000958
Citation Key2515
Refereed DesignationRefereed

The relation of the number of languages spoken to performance in different cognitive abilities in old age

TitreThe relation of the number of languages spoken to performance in different cognitive abilities in old age
Type de publicationJournal Article
Year of PublicationIn Press
AuteursIhle, A, Oris, M, Fagot, D, Kliegel, M
JournalJournal of Clinical and Experimental Neuropsychology
PaginationAdvance online publication
ISSN1380-3395
Mots-clésactivity engagement, cognitive functioning, cognitive reserve, multilingualism, older adults
Résumé

Introduction: Findings on the association of speaking different languages with cognitive functioning in old age are inconsistent and inconclusive so far. Therefore, the present study set out to investigate the relation of the number of languages spoken to cognitive performance and its interplay with several other markers of cognitive reserve in a large sample of older adults. Methods: Two thousand eight hundred and twelve older adults served as sample for the present study. Psychometric tests on verbal abilities, basic processing speed, and cognitive flexibility were administered. In addition, individuals were interviewed on their different languages spoken on a regular basis, educational attainment, occupation, and engaging in different activities throughout adulthood. Results: Higher number of languages regularly spoken was significantly associated with better performance in verbal abilities and processing speed, but unrelated to cognitive flexibility. Regression analyses showed that the number of languages spoken predicted cognitive performance over and above leisure activities/physical demand of job/gainful activity as respective additional predictor, but not over and above educational attainment/cognitive level of job as respective additional predictor. There was no significant moderation of the association of the number of languages spoken with cognitive performance in any model. Conclusions: Present data suggest that speaking different languages on a regular basis may additionally contribute to the built-up of cognitive reserve in old age. Yet, this may not be universal, but linked to verbal abilities and basic cognitive processing speed. Moreover, it may be dependent on other types of cognitive stimulation individuals also engaged in during their life course.

DOI10.1080/13803395.2016.1197184
Citation Key2634
Refereed DesignationRefereed

The influence of high and low cue–action association on prospective memory performance

TitreThe influence of high and low cue–action association on prospective memory performance
Type de publicationJournal Article
Year of PublicationIn Press
AuteursAlbiński, R, Kliegel, M, Gurynowicz, K
JournalJournal of Cognitive Psychology
PaginationAdvance online publication
ISSN2044-5911
Mots-cléscue-action association, prospective component, prospective memory, retrospective component, study times
Résumé

Recent discoveries in the field of prospective memory (PM) show higher accuracy for remembering intentions in which prospective cue and action are strongly associated. In two experiments presented in this paper participants encoded both high and low association cue–action pairs and were later tested on both prospective and retrospective PM components. Results of both studies show higher PM accuracy for the low association pairs compared to high association ones but only for the prospective component (across both Experiments) and only when a high association cue was presented first (Experiment 2). This finding was accompanied by longer study times for the low association pairs and study times were functionally related to later performance (across both Experiments). In the retrospective component higher accuracy was observed for pairs with high level of association (but only in the first Experiment). Data are discussed in the context of metacognitive processes possibly related to the encoding of an intention as well as cue monitoring in case of PM tasks with high memory load and varying task difficulty.

URLhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1080/20445911.2016.1186675
DOI10.1080/20445911.2016.1186675
Citation Key2687
Refereed DesignationRefereed

Do inhibitory control demands affect event-based prospective memory performance in ADHD?

TitreDo inhibitory control demands affect event-based prospective memory performance in ADHD?
Type de publicationJournal Article
Year of PublicationIn Press
AuteursAltgassen, M, Koch, A, Kliegel, M
JournalJournal of Attention Disorders
PaginationAdvance online publication
ISSN1557-1246
Mots-clésADHD, Executive Function, inhibition, prospective memory
Résumé

Objective: Empirical evidence on prospective memory (PM) in ADHD is inconsistent. Differential findings have been related to differential executive control demands. This study aimed at exploring the impact of inhibitory control on event-based PM performance in ADHD. Method: Eighteen adults with ADHD and 18 controls performed a word categorization task with an embedded event-based PM task. In addition participants performed an acoustically presented task that put either low or high loads on inhibitory control processes. Results: Inhibitory load did not differentially affect PM performance: Across both inhibitory load conditions individuals with ADHD showed reduced PM performance when compared with controls. Moreover inhibitory load did not influence PM performance across both groups. Conclusion: Possibly full inhibitory control resources are not necessary during the entire duration of an event-based PM task but may suffice to be employed after cue detection when needing to interrupt the ongoing task. (J. of Att. Dis. 2013; XX(X) 1-XX).

DOI10.1177/1087054713518236
Citation Key2689
Refereed DesignationRefereed

Children's planning performance in the Zoo Map task (BADS-C): Is it driven by general cognitive ability, executive functioning, or prospection?

TitreChildren's planning performance in the Zoo Map task (BADS-C): Is it driven by general cognitive ability, executive functioning, or prospection?
Type de publicationJournal Article
Year of PublicationIn Press
AuteursBallhausen, N, Mahy, CEV, Hering, A, Voigt, B, Schnitzspahn, KM, Lagner, P, Ihle, A, Kliegel, M
JournalApplied Neuropsychology: Child
PaginationAdvance online publication
ISSN2162-2965
Résumé

A minimal amount of research has examined the cognitive predictors of children's performance in naturalistic errand-type planning tasks such as the Zoo Map task of the Behavioral Assessment of the Dysexecutive Syndrome for Children (BADS-C). Thus the current study examined prospection (i.e. the ability to remember to carry out a future intention) executive functioning and intelligence markers as predictors of performance in this widely used naturalistic planning task in 56 children aged 7- to 12-years-old. Measures of planning prospection inhibition crystallized intelligence and fluid intelligence were collected in an individual differences study. Regression analyses showed that prospection (rather than traditional measures of intelligence or inhibition) predicted planning suggesting that naturalistic planning tasks such as the Zoo Map task may rely on future-oriented cognitive processes rather than executive problem solving or general knowledge.

URLhttp://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/21622965.2015.1124276
DOI10.1080/21622965.2015.1124276
Citation Key2690
Refereed DesignationRefereed

Pages