Performance of smokers with DSM-5 tobacco use disorder in time-based complex prospective memory

TitlePerformance of smokers with DSM-5 tobacco use disorder in time-based complex prospective memory
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2015
AuthorsBehrendt, S, Kliegel, M, Kräplin, A, Bühringer, G
JournalJournal of Psychoactive Drugs
Volume47
Issue3
Pagination203–212
ISSN0279-1072
Keywordsdependence, nicotine, prospective memory, smoking, substance use disorder
Abstract

Studies that investigate time-based complex prospective memory (PM) functioning in participants with substance use disorders (SUD) in consideration of different PM-phases (planning, retention, initiation, execution) are lacking. This study was designed to investigate performance of young adults with DSM-5 tobacco use disorder (TUD) and healthy controls (HC) in different phases of complex PM. Community participants aged 18–35 (N = 43) completed the modified Six Elements Test that includes the PM-phases planning, retention, initiation, and execution of a time-based complex PM-task (with delay phases and background activities). TUD participants were current daily smokers and fulfilled at least two DSM-5 TUD criteria. TUD did not differ significantly from HC in task planning errors and timely task initiation. No group differences showed in rule adherence and completeness during task conduction (execution). During execution, TUD showed significantly more deviations (Coef. 0.45; p = 0.005) from their originally remembered plans than HC. Young adults with relatively mild TUD do not show general impairments in all phases of short-term, complex, and time-based PM. Future research may investigate whether a greater risk of deviation from originally remembered plans in TUD could play a role in the progression and cessation of smoking behavior.

DOI10.1080/02791072.2015.1054008
Citation Key1699
Refereed DesignationRefereed
PubMed ID26147993

Cognitive and neural plasticity in older adults’ prospective memory following training with the Virtual Week computer game

TitleCognitive and neural plasticity in older adults’ prospective memory following training with the Virtual Week computer game
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2015
AuthorsRose, NS, Rendell, PG, Hering, A, Kliegel, M, Bidelman, GM, Craik, FIM
JournalFrontiers in Human Neuroscience
Volume9
Number592
Pagination1–13
Keywordsactivities of daily living (ADL), aging, cognitive training, ERPs (event-related potentials), prospective memory, Virtual Week
Abstract

Prospective memory (PM) – the ability to remember and successfully execute our intentions and planned activities – is critical for functional independence and declines with age, yet few studies have attempted to train PM in older adults. We developed a PM training program using the Virtual Week computer game. Trained participants played the game in 12, 1-h sessions over 1 month. Measures of neuropsychological functions, lab-based PM, event-related potentials (ERPs) during performance on a lab-based PM task, instrumental activities of daily living, and real-world PM were assessed before and after training. Performance was compared to both no-contact and active (music training) control groups. PM on the Virtual Week game dramatically improved following training relative to controls, suggesting PM plasticity is preserved in older adults. Relative to control participants, training did not produce reliable transfer to laboratory-based tasks, but was associated with a reduction of an ERP component (sustained negativity over occipito-parietal cortex) associated with processing PM cues, indicative of more automatic PM retrieval. Most importantly, training produced far transfer to real-world outcomes including improvements in performance on real-world PM and activities of daily living. Real-world gains were not observed in either control group. Our findings demonstrate that short-term training with the Virtual Week game produces cognitive and neural plasticity that may result in real-world benefits to supporting functional independence in older adulthood.

URLhttp://journal.frontiersin.org/article/10.3389/fnhum.2015.00592/abstract
DOI10.3389/fnhum.2015.00592
Citation Key1704
Refereed DesignationRefereed

Future thinking improves prospective memory performance and plan enactment in older adults

TitleFuture thinking improves prospective memory performance and plan enactment in older adults
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2015
AuthorsAltgassen, M, Rendell, PG, Bernhard, A, Henry, JD, Bailey, PE, Phillips, LH, Kliegel, M
JournalThe Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology
Volume68
Issue1
Pagination192–204
ISSN1747-0218
Keywordsageing, future thinking, imagery, planning, prospective memory
Abstract

Efficient intention formation might improve prospective memory by reducing the need for resource-demanding strategic processes during the delayed performance interval. The present study set out to test this assumption and provides the first empirical assessment of whether imagining a future action improves prospective memory performance equivalently at different stages of the adult lifespan. Thus, younger (n = 40) and older (n = 40) adults were asked to complete the Dresden Breakfast Task, which required them to prepare breakfast in accordance with a set of rules and time restrictions. All participants began by generating a plan for later enactment; however, after making this plan, half of the participants were required to imagine themselves completing the task in the future (future thinking condition), while the other half received standard instructions (control condition). As expected, overall younger adults outperformed older adults. Moreover, both older and younger adults benefited equally from future thinking instructions, as reflected in a higher proportion of prospective memory responses and more accurate plan execution. Thus, for both younger and older adults, imagining the specific visual–spatial context in which an intention will later be executed may serve as an easy-to-implement strategy that enhances prospective memory function in everyday life.

DOI10.1080/17470218.2014.956127
Citation Key1697
Refereed DesignationRefereed
PubMed ID25191929

Emotional valence differentially affects encoding and retrieval of prospective memory in older adults

TitleEmotional valence differentially affects encoding and retrieval of prospective memory in older adults
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2015
AuthorsBallhausen, N, Rendell, PG, Henry, JD, Joeffry, S, Kliegel, M
JournalAging, Neuropsychology, and Cognition
Volume22
Issue5
Pagination544–559
ISSN1382-5585
Keywordsaging, emotion, encoding, prospective memory, retrieval
Abstract

Studies manipulating emotional valence in prospective memory (PM) have so far revealed inconsistent results. In the present study, two experiments were conducted to systematically disentangle the effects of varying emotional valence in the encoding versus retrieval phase of PM in older adults. Results showed that, while cue valence at retrieval had no influence on PM performance, at encoding both positive and negative valence resulted in reduced PM performance. Findings suggest that emotional valence may have an influence on mnemonic processes at encoding rather than modifying cue detection in aging.

DOI10.1080/13825585.2014.1001316
Citation Key1698
Refereed DesignationRefereed
PubMed ID25633458

Differential effects of emotional cues on components of prospective memory: An ERP study

TitleDifferential effects of emotional cues on components of prospective memory: An ERP study
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2015
AuthorsCona, G, Kliegel, M, Bisiacchi, PS
JournalFrontiers in Human Neuroscience
Volume9
Number10
Pagination1–15
Keywordsdelayed intentions, emotion, ERPs, event-related potentials, LPP, neural, PLS, prospective memory
Abstract

So far, little is known about the neurocognitive mechanisms associated with emotion effects on prospective memory (PM) performance. Thus, this study aimed at disentangling possible mechanisms for the effects of emotional valence of PM cues on the distinct phases composing PM by investigating event-related potentials (ERPs). Participants were engaged in an ongoing N-back task while being required to perform a PM task. The emotional valence of both the ongoing pictures and the PM cues was manipulated (pleasant, neutral, unpleasant). ERPs were recorded during the PM phases, such as encoding, maintenance, and retrieval of the intention. A recognition task including PM cues and ongoing stimuli was also performed at the end of the sessions. ERP results suggest that emotional PM cues not only trigger an automatic, bottom-up, capture of attention, but also boost a greater allocation of top-down processes. These processes seem to be recruited to hold attention toward the emotional stimuli and to retrieve the intention from memory, likely because of the motivational significance of the emotional stimuli. Moreover, pleasant PM cues seemed to modulate especially the prospective component, as revealed by changes in the amplitude of the ERP correlates of strategic monitoring as a function of the relevance of the valence for the PM task. Unpleasant pictures seemed to modulate especially the retrospective component, as revealed by the largest old/new effect being elicited by unpleasant PM pictures in the recognition task.

URLhttp://journal.frontiersin.org/article/10.3389/fnhum.2015.00010/abstract
DOI10.3389/fnhum.2015.00010
Citation Key1700
Refereed DesignationRefereed

Prospective memory function in late adulthood: Affect at encoding and resource allocation costs

TitleProspective memory function in late adulthood: Affect at encoding and resource allocation costs
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2015
AuthorsHenry, JD, Joeffry, S, Terrett, G, Ballhausen, N, Kliegel, M, Rendell, PG
JournalPLoS ONE
Volume10
Issue4
Paginatione0125124
Abstract

Some studies have found that prospective memory (PM) cues which are emotionally valenced influence age effects in prospective remembering, but it remains unclear whether this effect reflects the operation of processes implemented at encoding or retrieval. In addition, none of the prior ageing studies of valence on PM function have examined potential costs of engaging in different valence conditions, or resource allocation trade-offs between the PM and the ongoing task. In the present study, younger, young-old and old-old adults completed a PM task in which the valence of the cues varied systematically (positive, negative or neutral) at encoding, but was kept constant (neutral) at retrieval. The results indicated that PM accuracy did not vary as a function of affect at encoding, and that this effect did not interact with age group. There was also no main or interaction effect of valence on PM reaction time in PM cue trials, indicating that valence costs across the three encoding conditions were equivalent. Old-old adults’ PM accuracy was reduced relative to both young-old and younger adults. Prospective remembering incurred dual-task costs for all three groups. Analyses of reaction time data suggested that for both young-old and old-old, these costs were greater, implying differential resource allocation cost trade-offs. However, when reaction time data were expressed as a proportional change that adjusted for the general slowing of the older adults, costs did not differ as a function of group.

DOI10.1371/journal.pone.0125124
Citation Key1701
Refereed DesignationRefereed

The impact of cognitive control on children’s goal monitoring in a time-based prospective memory task

TitleThe impact of cognitive control on children’s goal monitoring in a time-based prospective memory task
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2015
AuthorsMahy, CEV, Voigt, B, Ballhausen, N, Schnitzspahn, K, Ellis, J, Kliegel, M
JournalChild Neuropsychology
Volume21
Issue6
Pagination823–839
ISSN0929-7049
Keywordsdivided attention, inhibition, proactive control, prospective memory, reactive control, time monitoring
Abstract

The present study investigated whether developmental changes in cognitive control may underlie improvements of time-based prospective memory. Five-, 7-, 9-, and 11-year-olds (N = 166) completed a driving simulation task (ongoing task) in which they had to refuel their vehicle at specific points in time (PM task). The availability of cognitive control resources was experimentally manipulated by imposing a secondary task that required divided attention. Children completed the driving simulation task both in a full-attention condition and a divided-attention condition where they had to carry out a secondary task. Results revealed that older children performed better than younger children on the ongoing task and PM task. Children performed worse on the ongoing and PM tasks in the divided-attention condition compared to the full-attention condition. With respect to time monitoring in the final interval prior to the PM target, divided attention interacted with age such that older children’s time monitoring was more negatively affected by the secondary task compared to younger children. Results are discussed in terms of developmental shifts from reactive to proactive monitoring strategies.

DOI10.1080/09297049.2014.967202
Citation Key1702
Refereed DesignationRefereed
PubMed ID25342074

Older adults have difficulty in decoding sarcasm

TitleOlder adults have difficulty in decoding sarcasm
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2015
AuthorsPhillips, LH, Allen, R, Bull, R, Hering, A, Kliegel, M, Channon, S
JournalDevelopmental Psychology
Volume51
Issue12
Pagination1840–1852
ISSN1939-0599(Electronic);0012-1649(Print)
Keywordsage differences, aging, cues, emotions, intention, interpersonal interaction, social cognition
Abstract

Younger and older adults differ in performance on a range of social–cognitive skills, with older adults having difficulties in decoding nonverbal cues to emotion and intentions. Such skills are likely to be important when deciding whether someone is being sarcastic. In the current study we investigated in a life span sample whether there are age-related differences in the interpretation of sarcastic statements. Using both video and verbal materials, 116 participants aged between 18 and 86 completed judgments about whether statements should be interpreted literally or sarcastically. For the verbal stories task, older adults were poorer at understanding sarcastic intent compared with younger and middle-aged participants, but there was no age difference in interpreting control stories. For the video task, older adults showed poorer understanding of sarcastic exchanges compared with younger and middle-aged counterparts, but there was no age difference in understanding the meaning of sincere interactions. For the videos task, the age differences were mediated by the ability to perceive facial expressions of emotion. Age effects could not be explained in terms of variance in working memory. These results indicate that increased age is associated with specific difficulties in using nonverbal and contextual cues to understand sarcastic intent.

DOI10.1037/dev0000063
Citation Key1703
Refereed DesignationRefereed

Adaptation to loss

TitleAdaptation to loss
Publication TypeBook Chapter
Year of Publication2016
AuthorsBoerner, K, Jopp, D
EditorWhitbourne, SK
Book TitleThe Encyclopedia of Adulthood and Aging
Volume1
Number of Volumes3
Pagination18-23
PublisherWiley Blackwell
Place PublishedOxford
ISBN Number978-1-118-52892-1
Citation Key1691
Refereed DesignationRefereed

Gendered occupational shifts in the transition to parenthood: The influence of personal networks

TitleGendered occupational shifts in the transition to parenthood: The influence of personal networks
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of PublicationIn Press
AuthorsGiudici, F, Widmer, E
JournalSociology
PaginationAdvance online publication
KeywordsBott’s hypothesis, division of labour, network’s density, personal networks, transition to parenthood
Abstract

This article investigates the influence of personal networks on changes of occupational rates of men and women becoming parents. It discusses and measures the effects of various interconnected dimensions of network structures and compositions, such as density, degree of overlap between partners’ networks, geographical distance between network members, and types of relations (family, friendship, or others). A set of longitudinal analyses on 235 couples becoming parents in Switzerland shows that for women, higher density in emotional support triggers a reduction in occupational rates once the first child is born, while for men, a higher density in practical support is associated with an increase of occupational rates, with a resulting increase of gender inequalities in the division of paid labour. Results are valid both for intended changes and for changes observed in the transition, and they hold when controlling for parents’ educational level, income and personal values about gender equality.

DOI10.1177/0038038515601857
Citation Key1690
Refereed DesignationRefereed

Lay definitions of family and social capital in later life

TitleLay definitions of family and social capital in later life
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2015
AuthorsGirardin, M, Widmer, E
JournalPersonal Relationships
Volume22
Issue4
Pagination712-737
Abstract

This study explores the lay definitions of family in old age and their consequences for social capital in using an egocentric network approach. Data were derived from a subsample of 578 elders (aged 65 and older) from the Vivre/Leben/Vivere (VLV) study, a large survey addressing family life and health conditions of older people in Switzerland. A hierarchical cluster analysis was performed to create a typology of family networks based on family members who were cited as significant. We identified six family networks: Conjugal, Son, Daughter, Sibling, Kinship, and Sparse. These feature bonding and bridging social capital unequally. Therefore, one should take into account the lay definitions of family to better understand social capital within families in later life.

URLhttp://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/pere.12107/abstract
DOI10.1111/pere.12107
Citation Key1689
Refereed DesignationRefereed

Priority to local workers and its consequences on unemployment duration

TitlePriority to local workers and its consequences on unemployment duration
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2015
AuthorsBigotta, M
JournalLIVES Working Papers
Volume2015
Issue46
Pagination1-24
PublisherNCCR LIVES
ISSN2296-1658
Keywordsdifference-in-differences, employment priority, labour migration, policy evaluation, unemployment duration
Abstract

The impact of immigration on national labour markets is of increasing concern for policy makers. Employment, unemployment and wages are the traditional channels examined by social scientists when bringing evidence to the decision-making table. However, this paper contributes to the more limited empirical literature on migration's effects on unemployment duration, by exploiting the deregulation of migration policies between Switzerland and the European Union. It applies a counterfactual approach and implements difference-in-differences methodology paired with inverse probability weighting. This paper concludes ultimately that the abolition of the priority granted to local workers results in a rise in unemployment duration.

DOI10.12682/lives.2296-1658.2015.46
Citation Key1667

Different pathways out of the parental home: A gender perspective

TitleDifferent pathways out of the parental home: A gender perspective
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2015
AuthorsRossignon, F
JournalLIVES Working Papers
Volume2015
Issue45
Pagination1-33
PublisherNCCR LIVES
ISSN2296-1658
Keywordscompeting risk analysis, gender, home-leaving, pathways out of the parental home, Switzerland
Abstract

The aim of this study is to show that, because of socialisation process that develop normative conceptions of behaviours and attitudes that are appropriate for each sex category, men and women tend to choose different pathways out of the parental home. Using retrospective data from the LIVES Cohort survey, a panel survey of 1691 respondents that started in autumn 2013 in Switzerland, a competing risk analysis model has been developed. This approach examines the effects of sex and other independent variables, such as age, ethnic origin, family structure during childhood and place of residence on the propensity to leave home to live alone, to live with a partner or to share a residency with roommates. The results show that in comparison with men, women have a higher likelihood of leaving home to start a union. This confirms the idea according to which the diverging paths taken by men and women during their transition to adulthood can be considered as an anticipation of the roles they are expected to fulfil later in life or of the behaviours they feel is viewed by others as the right and socially accepted way to behave. Finally, there is some evidence that the impact of age, ethnic origin, family structure and place of residence on the different pathways out of the parental home varies according to sex. As a consequence, even though these independent factors have a significant impact on the departure from the parental home, it seems that sex overlaps this effect.

DOI10.12682/lives.2296-1658.2015.45
Citation Key1657

Le vieillissement actif: élaboration, légitimation et tentatives de diffusion d'un référentiel transversal en Europe

TitleLe vieillissement actif: élaboration, légitimation et tentatives de diffusion d'un référentiel transversal en Europe
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2015
AuthorsKaeser, L, Roch, P-A
JournalCritique internationale. Revue comparative de sciences sociales
Volume2015
Issue3
Number68
Pagination145-169
ISSN1290-7839
Citation Key1648
Refereed DesignationRefereed

The influence of interlocked employment-family trajectories on retirement timing

TitleThe influence of interlocked employment-family trajectories on retirement timing
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2016
AuthorsMadero Cabib, I, Gauthier, J-A, Le Goff, J-M
JournalWork, Aging and Retirement
Volume2
Issue1
Pagination38-53
ISSN2054-4642
Abstract

How are employment and family experiences simultaneously linked to the timing of retirement? Based on a life course perspective, this article aims to understand the way in which different work and family statuses accumulated throughout adult life, lead to early, on-time, or late withdrawals from the labor market. We focused on Switzerland, a country characterized by a liberal and flexible pension structure that provides widespread institutional mechanisms for both early and late retirement. Using longitudinal methods such as multichannel sequence analysis and event history analysis, we have created types of interlocked employment and family trajectories from age 20 to 57, and estimated their effects on the risk of retirement after age 58. The data come from the retrospective survey SHARELIFE, focused on ageing topics. The results show particularly that whereas early and “on-time” retirement is not likely for individuals—mostly women—with trajectories characterized by housework responsibilities, part-time jobs, and investments only in the public pension fund, late retirement is associated with the absence of a partner’s financial support. In the conclusion, we argue that the Swiss retirement institution should consider alternative mechanisms to offer more balanced retirement opportunities to its citizens, especially to those following less advantaged employment–family trajectories.

DOI10.1093/workar/wav023
Citation Key1647
Refereed DesignationRefereed

How voluntary is the active ageing life? A life-course study on the determinants of extending careers

TitleHow voluntary is the active ageing life? A life-course study on the determinants of extending careers
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of PublicationIn Press
AuthorsMadero Cabib, I, Kaeser, L
JournalEuropean Journal of Ageing
PaginationAdvance online publication
Keywordsactive ageing policies, late retirement, life-course determinants, voluntariness of retirement
Abstract

In Switzerland, as in many other European states, there is an increasing emphasis in public policy on promoting later retirement from the labour market. But this accelerating drive in Swiss policy-making to extend occupational activity does not mean that every worker is currently likely to retire late, nor does it imply that all those who do retire late do so voluntarily. This article uses a life-course approach, first to study the determinants of late retirement, and secondly to analyse whether the decision to postpone retirement is made voluntarily or involuntarily. Both objectives are addressed on the basis of data from the Swiss survey Vivre/Leben/Vivere. The results of logistic regression modelling indicate that, whereas self-employed and more highly educated individuals are more likely to retire late, people with access to private pension funds and workers who have benefited from periods of economic growth have a lower tendency to retire late. Regarding voluntariness, those who are more likely to opt for voluntary late retirement tend to be Swiss citizens, more highly educated, and also benefited from periods of economic expansion, while the self-employed, men and widowed individuals leaving the labour market late tend to do so involuntarily. In conclusion, the article discusses the absence of a social inequality debate in the design of active ageing policies.

DOI10.1007/s10433-015-0355-y
Citation Key1643
Refereed DesignationRefereed

Self-reported health among lone mothers: Do employment and education matter?

TitleSelf-reported health among lone mothers: Do employment and education matter?
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2015
AuthorsStruffolino, E, Bernardi, L, Voorpostel, M
JournalLIVES Working Papers
Volume2015
Issue44
Pagination1-28
PublisherNCCR LIVES
ISSN2296-1658
Keywordseducation, employment, family structure, health, life course, lone mothers, multiple disadvantages
Abstract

Lone motherhood is often associated to factors that increase women’s risk of developing poor health, such as being unemployed or poor. Employment fosters better physical health by attenuating economic hardship and improving overall well-being. However, employment can also represent an additional stress factor for lone mothers who face the dual role of main caregiver and main earner. Taking a life course perspective, we investigate how employment associate to self-assessed health of lone mothers in comparison to mothers living with a partner. In Switzerland, weak welfare provisions for families, expensive public childcare, and marriage- based taxation translate into a high incompatibility between work and family, in turn resulting in high shares of maternal part-time work. In this context, being a lone mother might be associated with worse health. Our analyses of the Swiss Household Panel (waves 1999-2011) compared lone mothers and mothers living with a partner, suggesting that lone mothers who are out of the labor market, especially those holding an upper-secondary degree, have a higher probability of poor health. We found that lone mothers working full-time were in better health than those working part-time but that the opposite applied to mothers living in couples. We argue that the negative association between health and paid work for lone mothers is the result of intersections between employment, education, and lone parenthood in a context of poor welfare support.

DOI10.12682/lives.2296-1658.2015.44
Citation Key1640

Inequality in social capital and labour market re-entry among unemployed people in Switzerland

TitleInequality in social capital and labour market re-entry among unemployed people in Switzerland
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2015
AuthorsBonoli, G, Turtschi, N
JournalResearch in Social Stratification and Mobility
Volume42
Pagination97-95
Keywordsinequality, social capital, social newtorks, unemployment
Abstract

Research on social capital inequality has tended to emphasise the fact that the distribution of social capital follows that of other resources, with the result that it tends to amplify social inequalities. More elaborated theoretical accounts and some empirical studies suggest, however, that under some circumstances, social capital can actually compensate for disadvantage in social position. In this paper we test these competing hypotheses on a population of newly unemployed people in the Swiss canton of Vaud (N = 3521). It appears that in most cases the distribution of social capital reflects that of other dimensions of stratification that are associated with labour market disadvantage, such as education, immigrant status, gender, and occupational status. On one important component of social capital, the number of work-related contacts, some immigrant groups score better than Swiss nationals. While this is an important predictor of early exit from unemployment, it fails to translate into an improvement of labour market prospects for the relevant immigrant groups, most likely because its effect is counteracted by more powerful forces such as inequality in skills and discrimination.

DOI10.1016/j.rssm.2015.09.004
Citation Key1639
Refereed DesignationRefereed

Pauvreté et trajectoires dans le canton de Vaud. Premiers résultats du suréchantillonnage du Panel suisse de ménages

TitlePauvreté et trajectoires dans le canton de Vaud. Premiers résultats du suréchantillonnage du Panel suisse de ménages
Publication TypeReport
Year of Publication2015
AuthorsBühlmann, F, Luisier, V, Kühr, J
Pagination82
Date Published07/2015
PublisherNCCR LIVES
Place PublishedLausanne
Keywordsdéprivation, pauvreté, trajectoires, Vaud
Citation Key1635

Is there a way back? A state-of-the-art review of the literature on retirement return migration

TitleIs there a way back? A state-of-the-art review of the literature on retirement return migration
Publication TypeBook Chapter
Year of Publication2016
AuthorsCiobanu, RO, Ramos, AC
EditorKarl, U, Torres, S
Book TitleAgeing in contexts of migration
Series TitleRoutledge Advances in Sociology
Chapter7
Pagination96-107
PublisherRoutledge
Place PublishedLondon/NewYork
ISBN Number978-0415738064
Citation Key1634

Pages