Book Review - Postcolonial Masculinities : Emotions, Histories and Ethics. By Amal Treacher Kabesh

TitleBook Review - Postcolonial Masculinities : Emotions, Histories and Ethics. By Amal Treacher Kabesh
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2015
AuthorsZouggari, N
JournalGender and Society
PaginationAdvance online publication
Date Publishedmay
Keywordsgender, masculinities, Postcolonial Studies
URLhttps://www.academia.edu/15299007/Gender_and_Society_-_August_2015
DOI10.1177/0891243215587266
Citation Key2853
Refereed DesignationNon-Refereed

De quel bois fait-on les ébénistes ? Quand l'ordre professionnel trouble la forme scolaire : l'apprentissage en Suisse

TitleDe quel bois fait-on les ébénistes ? Quand l'ordre professionnel trouble la forme scolaire : l'apprentissage en Suisse
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2016
AuthorsZouggari, N
JournalFormation Emploi
Issue133
Pagination157-176
Date Publishedmar
Keywordsclass, sociology of education, sociology of work, vocational education, work and labour
Abstract

This article aims to show that training in a profession can not be reduced to the acquisition of neutral skills and expertise : the production of a "professional order" based on a set of standards, particularly promoted by employers, actually contributes to strengthen a social order that the Swiss opinion tends to euphemise or even neutralize , through the institutionalization of consensus. So this article does illustrate , through the example of initial training of the Swiss cabinetmakers, the incorporation of a professional identity together with that of a social order.

URLhttps://www.academia.edu/21039976/De_quel_bois_fait-on_les_%C3%A9b%C3%A9nistes_Quand_l_ordre_profess
Citation Key2852
Refereed DesignationRefereed

The SAGE handbook of survey methodology

TitleThe SAGE handbook of survey methodology
Publication TypeBook
Year of Publication2016
Series EditorWolf, C, Joye, D, Smith, T, Fu, Y-chih
PublisherSAGE
Place PublishedLondon, UK
ISBN Number9781446282663
Abstract

Survey Methodology is becoming a more structured field of research, deserving of more and more academic attention. The SAGE Handbook of Survey Methodology explores both the increasingly scientific endeavour of surveys and their growing complexity, as different data collection modes and information sources are combined. The handbook takes a global approach, with a team of international experts looking at local and national specificities, as well as problems of cross-national, comparative survey research. The chapters are organized into seven major sections, each of which represents a stage in the survey life-cycle: Surveys and Societies Planning a Survey Measurement Sampling Data Collection Preparing Data for Use Assessing and Improving Data Quality The SAGE Handbook of Survey Methodology is a landmark and essential tool for any scholar within the social sciences.

URLhttp://dx.doi.org/10.4135/9781473957893
Citation Key2752
Refereed DesignationNon-Refereed

Survey methodology: challenges and principles

TitleSurvey methodology: challenges and principles
Publication TypeBook Chapter
Year of Publication2016
AuthorsJoye, D, Wolf, C, Smith, T, Fu, Y-chih
EditorWolf, C, Joye, D, Smith, T, Fu, Y-chih
Book TitleThe SAGE Handbook of Survey Methodology
Chapter1
Pagination3-15
PublisherSAGE
Place PublishedLondon, UK
ISBN Number9781473957893
DOI10.4135/9781473957893.n1
Citation Key2753
Refereed DesignationNon-Refereed

Defining and assessing survey climate

TitleDefining and assessing survey climate
Publication TypeBook Chapter
Year of Publication2016
AuthorsLoosveldt, G, Joye, D
EditorWolf, C, Joye, D, Smith, T, Fu, Y-chih
Book TitleThe SAGE Handbook of Survey Methodology
Chapter6
Pagination67-76
PublisherSAGE
Place PublishedLondon, UK
ISBN Number9781473957893
DOI10.4135/9781473957893.n6
Citation Key2754
Refereed DesignationNon-Refereed

When translation is not enough: background variables in comparative surveys

TitleWhen translation is not enough: background variables in comparative surveys
Publication TypeBook Chapter
Year of Publication2016
AuthorsSchneider, SL
EditorWolf, C, Joye, D, Smith, T, Fu, Y-chih
Book TitleThe SAGE Handbook of Survey Methodology
Chapter20
Pagination288-308
PublisherSAGE
Place PublishedLondon, UK
ISBN Number9781473957893
DOI10.4135/9781473957893.n20
Citation Key2756
Refereed DesignationNon-Refereed

Incentives as a possible measure to increase response rates

TitleIncentives as a possible measure to increase response rates
Publication TypeBook Chapter
Year of Publication2016
AuthorsErnst Stähli, M, Joye, D
EditorWolf, C, Joye, D, Smith, T, Fu, Y-chih
Book TitleThe SAGE Handbook of Survey Methodology
Chapter28
Pagination425-440
PublisherSAGE
Place PublishedLondon
ISBN Number9781473957893
DOI10.4135/9781473957893.n28
Citation Key2758
Refereed DesignationNon-Refereed

Harmonizing survey questions between cultures and over time

TitleHarmonizing survey questions between cultures and over time
Publication TypeBook Chapter
Year of Publication2016
AuthorsWolf, C, Schneider, SL, Behr, D, Joye, D
EditorWolf, C, Joye, D, Smith, T, Fu, Y-chih
Book TitleThe SAGE Handbook of Survey Methodology
Chapter33
Pagination502-524
PublisherSAGE
Place PublishedLondon, UK
ISBN Number9781473957893
DOI10.4135/9781473957893.n33
Citation Key2759
Refereed DesignationNon-Refereed

Response styles in surveys: Understanding their causes and mitigating their impact on data quality

TitleResponse styles in surveys: Understanding their causes and mitigating their impact on data quality
Publication TypeBook Chapter
Year of Publication2016
AuthorsRoberts, C
EditorWolf, C, Joye, D, Smith, T, Fu, Y-chih
Book TitleThe SAGE Handbook of Survey Methodology
Chapter36
Pagination579-598
PublisherSAGE
Place PublishedLondon
ISBN Number9781473957893
DOI10.4135/9781473957893.n36
Citation Key2760
Refereed DesignationNon-Refereed

Physical, cognitive, social and mental health in near-centenarians and centenarians living in New York City: Findings from the Fordham Centenarian Study

TitlePhysical, cognitive, social and mental health in near-centenarians and centenarians living in New York City: Findings from the Fordham Centenarian Study
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2016
AuthorsJopp, D, Park, M-K, Lehrfeld, J, Paggi, M
JournalBMC Geriatrics
Volume16
Issue1
Pagination1-10
Date Publishedjan
KeywordsCentenarians, cognition, Community and public health, depression, Health and well-being, Social resources
Abstract

Background: Despite their strong increase, the population of the very old, including near-centenarians and centenarians, represent an unstudied and underserved population. Available studies mostly concentrate on predictors of exceptional longevity, but rarely extend their focus to other areas of functioning. Also, little is known about what contributes to experiencing a quality life in very old age. The present population-based study aims at providing a comprehensive picture of key domain of functioning, including physical, cognitive, social and mental function in very old individuals and to determine predictors of mental health indicators. Methods: A total of 119 individuals aged 95 to 107 living in private dwellings and residential care facilities were recruited based on the New York City Voters Registry. Participants answered questions regarding their health and activities of daily living. Their cognitive functioning was determined using the Mini-Mental State Examination and the Global Deterioration Scale. Social resources were measured with number of children and the Lubben Scale. Mental health was assessed with the Geriatric Depression Scale and the Satisfaction with Life Scale. Results: An unexpectedly large proportion of the sample lived in the community. On average, cognitive functioning was high. Although five diseases were reported on average, participants reported good health. Functional status was reduced. Most participants had at least one person for communication/social support. On average, depression was below cut-off, and most participants reported high life satisfaction. Regression analyses indicated that individual differences in depression were associated with subjective health, IADL and relatives support. For life satisfaction, subjective health, ADL and number of children were most important. Demographic characteristics, number of illnesses or cognitive status were not significant. Conclusions: Despite reduced levels of physical functioning and social resources, very old participants were in good mental health suggesting high resilience and ability to adapt to age-associated challenges. That a large proportion of them lived in the community further highlights their desire for leading an autonomous life, which may have been facilitated by New York service culture. More research is necessary to provide guidance for the development of well-suited services for this very old population.

DOI10.1186/s12877-015-0167-0
Citation Key1922
Refereed DesignationRefereed

Challenges experienced at age 100: Findings from the Fordham Centenarian Study

TitleChallenges experienced at age 100: Findings from the Fordham Centenarian Study
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2016
AuthorsJopp, D, Boerner, K, Cimarolli, V, Hicks, S, Jeswani, S, Paggi, M, Cavanagh, A, Kennedy, E
JournalJournal of Aging and Social Policy
Volume28
Issue3
Pagination187-207
Keywordsaging, Centenarians, depression, health, longevity, oldes old, quality of life, well-being
Abstract

This article examines the challenges experienced by very old individuals and their consequences for well-being and mental health. In order to capture unique issues experienced in very old age, 75 participants of the population-based Fordham Centenarian Study answered open-ended questions on everyday challenges. Theme-based coding was then used to categorize and quantify responses. The challenges mentioned most often were challenges faced in the functional (e.g., physical health/activities of daily living restrictions, mobility, sensory impairment), psychological (e.g., loss of well-liked activity, dependency, negative emotions, death), and social (e.g., family loss) life domains. Functional challenges were negatively associated with aging satisfaction and positively associated with loneliness. Psychological challenges were positively linked to aging satisfaction. Social challenges were marginally related to loneliness. Notably, challenges were not related to depression. In conclusion, the challenges experienced in very old age are multidimensional and multifaceted, unique in nature, and have differential relations to mental health. Functional, psychological, and social challenges affect very old individuals’ lives and therefore need to be better understood and addressed. Given their consequences, it is imperative for policy makers to develop an awareness for the different types of challenges faced by centenarians, as there may be unique policy implications related to each.

DOI10.1080/08959420.2016.1163652
Citation Key1927
Refereed DesignationRefereed

Perceptions of alzheimer’s disease in the French population: Evolutions between 2008 and 2013 and associated factors in 2013

TitlePerceptions of alzheimer’s disease in the French population: Evolutions between 2008 and 2013 and associated factors in 2013
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2015
AuthorsLéon, C, Pin Le Corre, S, Kreft-Jaïs, C, Arwidson, P
JournalJournal of Alzheimer's Disease
Volume47
Issue2
Pagination467-478
KeywordsAlzheimer's disease, general public, opinions, perceptions, survey
Abstract

Background: The negative image surrounding AD has a substantial impact on caregiving and on those affected by the disease. Opinion surveys were created as part of the 2008–2012 Alzheimer Plan in France, which included two surveys of the general population, at the beginning and at the end. Objective: To evaluate changes of the French population in perceptions, knowledge and beliefs over 5 years and to analyze dimensions with sociodemographics criteria and proximity with AD. Methods: After selection by quota sampling, 2013 French people aged 18 years and over were interviewed by phone in 2008 and 2509 in 2013. Chi-squared tests were carried out to measure the changes between two periods and multivariate logistics regressions were used to assess perceptions. Results: People who cited AD as one of the three most serious diseases increased in 2013 (33.6% versus 26.7% in 2008; p

DOI10.3233/JAD-142922
Citation Key2002
Refereed DesignationRefereed

Assimilative processes in a client with borderline personality disorder: Tracking internal multiplicity over the first ten sessions of therapy

TitleAssimilative processes in a client with borderline personality disorder: Tracking internal multiplicity over the first ten sessions of therapy
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2016
AuthorsKramer, U, Meystre, C, Imesch, C, Kolly, S
JournalJournal of Psychotherapy Integration
Pagination144-159
Date Publishedjun
Abstract

The assimilation of problematic experiences as operationalization of internal multiplicity has been studied as change processes in psychotherapies of different client populations. However, there is little research investigating the assimilation processes with a particular focus on clients with borderline personality disorder (BPD), as they engage in treatment. Internal multiplicity describes the presence, within the person, of different centers of experience, called inner “voices.” These may result from unresolved traumatic experiences associated with BPD. The current study is a theory-building case study, which aims at understanding the evolution of internal multiplicity in a short-term treatment over 10 sessions for a client with BPD, aiming at engagement in long-term treatment. The case, Louise, presents with a high potential of internal conflicts, showing 4 antagonistic problematic voices. The intensive assimilation analysis of these voices, with regard to the dominant voice, suggests that their assimilative change tends to pass from chaotic multivoice cacophony to a structuring 2-voice dialogue (i.e., a mutual elaboration of the conflicts). Our results underline that internal dialogue between previously opposed voices may be a productive way for clients with BPD to evolve in therapy and use their internal multiplicity as a resource. Narrative details and illustrations are presented to document Louise’s change processes over her process of engagement in therapy.

URLhttp://psycnet.apa.org/journals/int/26/2/144/
DOI10.1037/a0040044
Citation Key2837
Refereed DesignationRefereed

Development and validation of the Maladaptive Daydreaming Scale (MDS)

TitleDevelopment and validation of the Maladaptive Daydreaming Scale (MDS)
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2016
AuthorsSomer, E, Lehrfeld, J, Bigelsen, J, Jopp, D
JournalConsciousness and Cognition
Volume39
Pagination77-91
Date Publishedjan
Keywordsfantasy proneness, maladaptive daydreaming, mind-wandering
Abstract

This study describes the development of the Maladaptive Daydreaming Scale (MDS), a 14-item self-report instrument designed to gauge abnormal fantasizing. Our sample consisted of 447 English-speaking individuals from 45 different countries. A 3-correlated-factors model best presented the underlying dimensions Yearning, Kinesthesia and Impairment, capturing related rewarding experiences as well as psychological impairment of maladaptive daydreaming. MDS scores were associated with obsessive–compulsive behavior and thoughts, dissociative absorption, attention deficit, and high sense of presence during daydreaming, but less with psychotic symptoms. The MDS and its subscale demonstrated good validity, sound internal consistency and temporal stability and discriminated well between self-identified individuals with and without maladaptive daydreaming. Considering the instrument’s high sensitivity and specificity levels, it seems an excellent measure for future investigation of MD that will, hopefully, shed light on the etiology and psycho-biological mechanisms involved in this mental condition, as well as on the development of effective MD treatment methods.

DOI
Citation Key2838
Refereed DesignationRefereed

Quelle place pour l'étude du cas unique dans la construction de la théorie clinique? Illustration par le modèle de l'assimilation

TitleQuelle place pour l'étude du cas unique dans la construction de la théorie clinique? Illustration par le modèle de l'assimilation
Publication TypeBook Chapter
Year of Publication2016
AuthorsMeystre, C
EditorPomini, V, de Roten, Y, Brodard, F, Quartier, V
Book TitleL'étude de cas: Dialogue entre recherche et pratique en psychologie clinique et psychothérapie
Pagination173-193
PublisherAntipodes
Place PublishedLausanne, Switzerland
Citation Key2841
Refereed DesignationNon-Refereed

Meeting the needs of the growing very old population: Policy implications for a global challenge

TitleMeeting the needs of the growing very old population: Policy implications for a global challenge
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2016
AuthorsPin Le Corre, S, Spini, D
JournalJournal of aging & social policy
Volume28
Issue3
Pagination218-231
DOI10.1080/08959420.2016.1181972
Citation Key2981
Refereed DesignationRefereed

Contribution of personality, job strain, and occupational self-efficacy to job satisfaction in different occupational contexts

TitleContribution of personality, job strain, and occupational self-efficacy to job satisfaction in different occupational contexts
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2016
AuthorsMaggiori, C, Johnston, C, Rossier, J
JournalJournal of Career Development
Volume43
Issue3
Pagination244-259
Keywordsjob satisfaction, job strain, occupational categories, occupational self-efficacy, personality dimensions
Abstract

Using a large sample of employed adults (N ¼ 1,714) living in Switzerland, this study investigates the relationship between the five-factor model of personality dimensions and job satisfaction, considering the role of job strain as defined by Karasek’s job demand–control model and occupational self-efficacy. These relationships were assessed both within the overall sample of employed and specific occupational groups. The analyses on the overall sample show an effect of neuroticism and extroversion on job satisfaction. Furthermore, job strain and occupational self-efficacy are related to job satisfaction. The effect of neuroticism is partly mediated by job strain and occupational self-efficacy, while extroversion and conscientiousness have an indirect effect through occupational self-efficacy. When we consider the occupational groups, the results highlight differences between the groups showing variability in the relationship between personality, job strain and occupational self-efficacy, and their effects on job satisfaction.

DOI10.1177/0894845315597474
Citation Key877
Refereed DesignationRefereed

A dynamic model of applicant faking

TitleA dynamic model of applicant faking
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2016
AuthorsRoulin, N, Krings, F, Binggeli, S
JournalOrganizational Psychology Review
Volume6
Issue2
Pagination145-170
Keywordscompetition, faking, selection, signaling theory
Abstract

In the past years, several authors have proposed theoretical models of faking at selection. Although these models greatly improved our understanding of applicant faking, they mostly offer static approaches. In contrast, we propose a model of applicant faking derived from signaling theory, which describes faking as a dynamic process driven by applicants’ and organizations’ adaptations in a competitive environment. We argue that faking depends on applicants’ motivation and capacity to fake, which are determined by individual differences in skills, abilities, and stable attitudes, as well as by perceptions of the competition, but also on applicants’ perceived opportunities versus risks to fake, which are contingent upon organizations’ measures to increase the costs of faking. We further explain how selection outcomes can trigger adaptations of applicants, such as faking in subsequent selection encounters, and of organizations, such as changes in measures making faking costly for applicants in the long term.

DOI10.1177/2041386615580875
Citation Key1384
Refereed DesignationRefereed

Cross-cultural generalizability of the alternative five-factor model using the Zuckerman-Kuhlman-Aluja personality questionnaire

TitleCross-cultural generalizability of the alternative five-factor model using the Zuckerman-Kuhlman-Aluja personality questionnaire
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2016
AuthorsRossier, J, Aluja, A, Blanch, A, Barry, O, Hansenne, M, Carvalho, AF, Valdivia, M, Wang, W, Desrichard, O, Hyphantis, T, Suranyi, Z, Glicksohn, J, De Pascalis, V, León-Mayer, E, Piskunov, A, Stivers, A, Morizot, J, Ostendorf, F, Čekrlija, Đ, Bellaj, T, Markiewicz, D, Motevalian, A, Karagonlar, G
JournalEuropean Journal of Personality
Volume30
Pagination139-157
KeywordsAlternative Five-factor Model of personality traits, culture, measurement invariance
Abstract

Several personality models are known for being replicable across cultures, such as the Five-Factor Model (FFM) or Eysenck’s Psychoticism–Extraversion–Neuroticism (PEN) model, and are for this reason considered universal. The aim of the current study was to evaluate the cross-cultural replicability of the recently revised Alternative FFM (AFFM). A total of 15 048 participants from 23 cultures completed the Zuckerman–Kuhlman–Aluja Personality Question- naire (ZKA-PQ) aimed at assessing personality according to this revised AFFM. Internal consistencies, gender differences and correlations with age were similar across cultures for all five factors and facet scales. The AFFM structure was very similar across samples and can be considered as highly replicable with total congruence coefficients ranging from .94 to .99. Measurement invariance across cultures was assessed using multi-group confirmatory factor analyses, and each higher-order personality factor did reach configural and metric invariance. Scalar invariance was never reached, which implies that culture-specific norms should be considered. The underlying structure of the ZKA-PQ replicates well across cultures, suggesting that this questionnaire can be used in a large diversity of cultures and that the AFFM might be as universal as the FFM or the PEN model. This suggests that more research is needed to identify and define an integrative framework underlying these personality models. Copyright © 2016 European Association of Personality Psychology

DOI10.1002/per.2045
Citation Key2027
Refereed DesignationRefereed

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