A survey of couples facing breast cancer in women

TitleA survey of couples facing breast cancer in women
Publication TypeBook Chapter
Year of Publication2016
AuthorsCharvoz, L, Favez, N, Cairo Notari, S, Panes-Ruedin, B, Delaloye, J-F
EditorOris, M, Roberts, C, Joye, D, Ernst Stähli, M
Book TitleSurveying human vulnerabilities across the life course
Series TitleLife Course Research and Social Policies
Chapter5
Pagination113-129
PublisherSpringer
Place PublishedNew York
ISBN Number978-3-319-24157-9
Abstract

Breast cancer is a reality for 5000 women in Switzerland every year and, when these women are in a committed relationship, represents a critical event for their partners as well. For this reason, there is now a consensus in the literature to consider breast cancer as an event involving couples as much as women alone. Research should also take into account women and partners and should be extended to couples as a unit. Up to now, it has been difficult to draw a synthesis from the data available in the body of writings on the impact of cancer on couples, as methodologies have been diverse and vary between studies. Thus, the goal of this chapter is first of all to present the advantages and limitations of the two main methods of assessment that are used in the domain of couple relationships: questionnaires and observation. The necessity to combine the different methods is then discussed. At last, comments will be illustrated with a project conducted in Switzerland funded by the Swiss National Science Foundation that formed part of the National Centre of Competence in Research (NCCR) “LIVES – Overcoming Vulnerability: Life Course Perspectives” and which examined couples facing breast cancer using a mixed method approach.

DOI10.1007/978-3-319-24157-9_5
Citation Key1985

Attrition in the Swiss Household Panel: Are vulnerable groups more affected than others?

TitleAttrition in the Swiss Household Panel: Are vulnerable groups more affected than others?
Publication TypeBook Chapter
Year of Publication2016
AuthorsRothenbühler, M, Voorpostel, M
EditorOris, M, Roberts, C, Joye, D, Ernst Stähli, M
Book TitleSurveying human vulnerabilities across the life course
Series TitleLife Course Research and Social Policies
Chapter10
Pagination221-242
PublisherSpringer
Place PublishedNew York
ISBN Number978-3-319-24157-9
Abstract

Panel attrition is one of the main concerns to longitudinal surveys, and may be especially problematic when vulnerable populations are concerned. This study looks into nonresponse and attrition in the Swiss Household Panel (SHP), focusing on the following two questions: (1) To what extent does attrition create bias in means and frequencies, and does weighting correct for this? (2) Are respondents who are at risk of vulnerability more likely to drop out from the SHP compared to others and if so, why? Our results based on data from 1999 to 2012 indicate that there are different nonresponse patterns in the SHP and that attrition is not completely at random, but is related to specific characteristics that are often associated with vulnerability. In particular respondents with a migration background, a low level of education, who are unemployed or whose health status is poor are more likely to drop out. Using weights only partially corrects for the selective dropout. Although general population surveys such as the SHP provide unique opportunities to study vulnerability in the population, researchers should be aware that overall prevalence of vulnerability is most likely underestimated.

DOI10.1007/978-3-319-24157-9_10
Citation Key1984

Studying youth transitions through a social network: First impressions

TitleStudying youth transitions through a social network: First impressions
Publication TypeBook Chapter
Year of Publication2016
AuthorsEicher, V, Bakouri, M, Staerklé, C, Carvalhosa Barbosa, M, Clémence, A
EditorOris, M, Roberts, C, Joye, D, Ernst Stähli, M
Book TitleSurveying human vulnerabilities across the life course
Series TitleLife Course Research and Social Policies
Chapter9
Pagination201-219
PublisherSpringer
Place PublishedNew York
ISBN Number978-3-319-24157-9
Abstract

In this chapter we present an online social network created for the study of life transitions of young adults. We first give a brief overview of the overall goals of the study and outline two research questions to be studied with the online social network. We then present the rationale for using and developing our own network. Next, we describe the online social network: the concrete steps of creating the network, its functions and characteristics, and first results based on a sample of 365 young adults. These first findings reveal that the social network has so far not worked as intended: Participants are reluctant to use the network and more effort is required in motivating them to actively use it. We discuss possible reasons for the serious difficulties in attracting participants to engage with the network and relate the problems faced during the development and maintenance of the network. Finally, we outline alternative possibilities of using online social networks in future research.

DOI10.1007/978-3-319-24157-9_9
Citation Key1983

Using life history calendars to survey vulnerability

TitleUsing life history calendars to survey vulnerability
Publication TypeBook Chapter
Year of Publication2016
AuthorsMorselli, D, Dasoki, N, Gabriel, R, Gauthier, J-A, Henke, J, Le Goff, J-M
EditorOris, M, Roberts, C, Joye, D, Ernst Stähli, M
Book TitleSurveying human vulnerabilities across the life course
Series TitleLife Course Research and Social Policies
Chapter8
Pagination177-199
PublisherSpringer
Place PublishedNew York
ISBN Number978-3-319-24157-9
Abstract

This chapter discusses the rationale for the use of life history calendars in studying social and psychological vulnerability. Pragmatic and substantive aspects suggest that life history calendars are powerful tools for retrospective surveys on vulnerability. Life history calendars are substantially more cost-effective and easier to implement than prospective longitudinal designs while being in line with the life course paradigm. They can be used as follows: to investigate how people react to negative life events and which resources come into play to overcome conditions of vulnerability; to understand processes of accumulation of (dis)advantages in relation to the concept of vulnerability; and to observe how such processes are constructed across the life course and across life domains. In addition life history calendars address the interconnection between the factual events and their subjective perception by participants. Thus data produced by life history calendars are suitable to different paradigms that apply life histories as a socio-cognitive process. This chapter presents four tools developed at the University of Lausanne and the University of Geneva with a special focus on the operationalisation of different aspects of vulnerability such as the study of accumulation and diffusion effects of (dis)advantages across life domains.

DOI10.1007/978-3-319-24157-9_8
Citation Key1982

Career pathways and professional transitions: Preliminary results from the first wave of a 7-year longitudinal study

TitleCareer pathways and professional transitions: Preliminary results from the first wave of a 7-year longitudinal study
Publication TypeBook Chapter
Year of Publication2016
AuthorsMaggiori, C, Rossier, J, Krings, F, Johnston, C, Massoudi, K
EditorOris, M, Roberts, C, Joye, D, Ernst Stähli, M
Book TitleSurveying human vulnerabilities across the life course
Chapter6
Pagination131-157
PublisherSpringer
Place PublishedNew York
ISBN Number978-3-319-24157-9
Abstract

The main purpose of this chapter is to present and to discuss the implementation and the main methodological characteristics, notably in terms of design and research protocol, sampling and data collection procedure via a mixed-mode approach, of our 7-year longitudinal study on professional trajectories. More specifically, adopting several psychological perspectives, this study addresses professional transitions and career pathways and personal experiences – particularly in terms of well-being – of employed and unemployed middle-aged adults (25–55 years) living in Switzerland. Furthermore, based on the first wave of data (N = 2469), we introduce some results concerning, amongst others, the predictors of the choice of the mode to complete the questionnaire and of the intention to participate in the next wave, and possible differences on vulnerability indicators with reference to personal characteristics, resources and professional situation. Finally, considering the procedure implemented and the results emerging from this first wave, we discuss several implications and challenges for the next waves.

DOI10.1007/978-3-319-24157-9_6
Citation Key1981

Adapting quantitative survey procedures: The price for assessing vulnerability? Lessons from a large-scale survey on aging and migration in Switzerland

TitleAdapting quantitative survey procedures: The price for assessing vulnerability? Lessons from a large-scale survey on aging and migration in Switzerland
Publication TypeBook Chapter
Year of Publication2016
AuthorsKaeser, L
EditorOris, M, Roberts, C, Joye, D, Ernst Stähli, M
Book TitleSurveying human vulnerabilities across the life course
Series TitleLife Course Research and Social Policies
Chapter3
Pagination65-85
PublisherSpringer
Place PublishedNew York
ISBN Number978-3-319-24157-9
Abstract

This chapter aims at understanding the issues of capturing vulnerable populations in large-scale quantitative surveys. A dilemma in survey construction arises when a target vulnerable population to be analyzed cannot be reached using standard survey designs. Indeed, adapting standard procedures may improve access to the targeted vulnerable population; however, these changes may lead to inaccurate comparisons with other population samples. To address this issue, this chapter deals with the data collection process of the large-scale survey on aging Vivre/Leben/Vivere: Old Age Democratization? Progress and Inequalities in Switzerland (VLV). It highlights the need to adjust standard procedures of a quantitative survey to access elderly migrants and the impact of doing so. Results show the need for a constant dialogue between the scientific requirements and realities of fieldwork to avoid an under-representation in surveys. Finally, providing resources to assess vulnerability is not only a methodological engagement; this is also a major social issue about giving a voice to the voiceless.

DOI10.1007/978-3-319-24157-9_3
Citation Key1980

Representation of vulnerability and the elderly. A Total Survey Error perspective on the VLV survey

TitleRepresentation of vulnerability and the elderly. A Total Survey Error perspective on the VLV survey
Publication TypeBook Chapter
Year of Publication2016
AuthorsOris, M, Guichard, E, Nicolet, M, Gabriel, R, Tholomier, A, Monnot, C, Fagot, D, Joye, D
EditorOris, M, Roberts, C, Joye, D, Ernst Stähli, M
Book TitleSurveying human vulnerabilities across the life course
Series TitleLife Course Research and Social Policies
Chapter2
Pagination27-64
PublisherSpringer
Place PublishedNew York
ISBN Number978-3-319-24157-9
Keywordselderly, methodology, non-response, participation rate, survey, Switzerland
Abstract

This chapter focuses on the “Vivre-Leben-Vivere” (VLV) research and explains how the team in charge has dealt with the issue of representing old people in Switzerland and the vulnerable persons within this population. For this purpose, we draw inspiration from the “total survey error” perspective and discuss the procedures that were used to collect the information, but also the quality of the information itself. We present some of VLV’s methodological choices, such as the contact procedures that were designed to “capture” the most vulnerable individuals, especially in a context where refusal rates for participation in surveys are increasing. We also consider the missing values in responses to some “complex” topics. Results show that participation rates are highly related to the effort that was made in order to recruit the individuals. This is critical for the VLV project, where people can show different degrees of vulnerability related to age, health, and/or poverty. In this sense, efforts such as repeated calls, home visits, and the proxy procedure were successful both in a general perspective and more specifically for a fair inclusion of vulnerable persons in the survey. At the same time, the non-response rates show to what extent it is difficult to explain the personal decision not to respond to a survey or to a question. We can find some traces of “interviewer effects” in the analysis of item non-responses, which we have done by using a logistic regression for one of the psychological tests included in VLV. Some aspects relate to interviewer and respondent characteristics, but others relate to the interview context, all highlighting the complex social interactions at stake.

DOI10.1007/978-3-319-24157-9_2
Citation Key1979

Surveying human vulnerabilities across the life course

TitleSurveying human vulnerabilities across the life course
Publication TypeBook
Year of Publication2016
Series EditorOris, M, Roberts, C, Joye, D, Ernst Stähli, M
Series TitleLife Course Research and Social Policies
Number of Pages242
PublisherSpringer
Place PublishedNew York
ISBN Number978-3-319-24155-5
Keywordsfamily, life course, methods, Switzerland, vulnerability, work
Abstract

This volume details tools and procedures for data collections of hard-to-reach, hard-to-survey populations. Inside, readers will discover first-hand insights from experts who share their successes as well as their failures in their attempts to identify and measure human vulnerabilities across the life course. Coverage first provides an introduction on studying vulnerabilities based on the Total Error Survey framework. Next, the authors present concrete examples on how to survey such populations as the elderly, migrants, widows and widowers, couples facing breast cancer, employees and job seekers, displaced workers, and teenagers during their transition to adulthood. In addition, one essay discusses the rationale for the use of life history calendars in studying social and psychological vulnerability while another records the difficulty the authors faced when trying to set-up an online social network to collect relevant data. Overall, this book demonstrates the importance to have, from the very beginning, a dialogue between specialists of survey methods and the researchers working on social dynamics across the life span. It will serve as an indispensable resource for social scientists interested in gathering and analyzing data on vulnerable individuals and populations in order to construct longitudinal data bases and properly target social policies.

DOI10.1007/978-3-319-24157-9
Citation Key1978

Multidimensionality of the life course, spillover effects, and well-being: How do parenthood and personality affect changes in domain-specific satisfaction?

TitleMultidimensionality of the life course, spillover effects, and well-being: How do parenthood and personality affect changes in domain-specific satisfaction?
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2016
AuthorsBernardi, L, Potârcă, G, Bollmann, G, Rossier, J
JournalLIVES Working Papers
Volume2016
Issue54
Pagination1-35
ISSN2296-1658
Keywordslife course, personality, spillover effects, transition to parenthood, well-being
Abstract

While widely recognized as important determinants of well-being, spillover effects across life domains after a critical event or transition are largely understudied in a truly longitudinal perspective. Specifically, little is known about how becoming a parent produces variations in subjective well-being in other life domains. By adopting a life-course perspective, we contributed to such questions by examining trajectories of life, job, and leisure satisfaction before and after first childbirth by gender and personality. Drawing on data from the German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP; 1984–2013), we show that the shape of life and leisure satisfaction trajectories after birth subtly differ for men and women. Moreover, job satisfaction drops significantly shortly before childbirth only for women, rising again after the 1st year after childbirth. Personality moderates some of these relationships. Our results indicate that spillovers across life domains and their impact on well-being should be addressed in a longitudinal and multidisciplinary perspective.

DOI10.12682/lives.2296-1658.2016.54
Citation Key1976
Refereed DesignationRefereed

Market Externalities of Large Unemployment Insurance Extension Programs

TitleMarket Externalities of Large Unemployment Insurance Extension Programs
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2015
AuthorsLalive, R, Landais, C, Zweimüller, J
JournalAmerican Economic Review
Volume105
Issue12
Number12
Pagination3564-96
Date Publisheddec
URLhttps://www.aeaweb.org/articles?id=10.1257/aer.20131273
DOI10.1257/aer.20131273
Citation Key2143
Refereed DesignationRefereed

Wage compression within the firm

TitleWage compression within the firm
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2015
AuthorsLeonardi, M, Pellizzari, M, Tabasso, D
JournalForschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit (IZA)
Number9254
Date Publishedaug
Abstract

We study the distributional effect of a wage indexation mechanism - the Scala Mobile (SM) - that heavily compressed the distribution of Italian wages during the 1970s and 1980s. The SM imposed large real wage increases at the bottom of the distribution and was essentially irrelevant for high-wage workers. We document that this mechanism triggered a strong redistribution within the firm. Skilled workers received lower wage adjustments when employed at firms with many unskilled workers and they tended to move towards more skill- intensive firms. We rationalize these findings with a simplified model of intra-firm bargaining with on-the- job search.

Citation Key2260
Refereed DesignationNon-Refereed

Qualitative report on Leaky Pipeline phenomenon - University of Lausanne

TitleQualitative report on Leaky Pipeline phenomenon - University of Lausanne
Publication TypeReport
Year of Publication2016
AuthorsBataille, P
Date Publishedapr
PublisherUniversity of Trento
Place PublishedTrento
Keywordsacademic profession, gender, vulnerability
Citation Key2320
Refereed DesignationNon-Refereed

Proceedings of the International Conference on Sequence Analysis and Related Methods, LaCOSA II

TitleProceedings of the International Conference on Sequence Analysis and Related Methods, LaCOSA II
Publication TypeBook
Year of Publication2016
AuthorsRitschard, G, Studer, M
Place PublishedLausanne, Switzerland
Keywordssequence analysis
URLhttps://lacosa.lives-nccr.ch/sites/lacosa.lives-nccr.ch/files/lacosa2-proceedings.pdf
Citation Key2546
Refereed DesignationRefereed

How to survey displaced workers in Switzerland: Ways of addressing sources of bias

TitleHow to survey displaced workers in Switzerland: Ways of addressing sources of bias
Publication TypeBook Chapter
Year of Publication2016
AuthorsBaumann, I, Lipps, O, Oesch, D, Vandenplas, C
EditorOris, M, Roberts, C, Joye, D, Ernst Stähli, M
Book TitleSurveying human vulnerabilities across the life course
Series TitleLife Course and Social Policies
Chapter7
Pagination159-176
PublisherSpringer
Place PublishedNew York
ISBN Number978-3-319-24157-9
Keywordscareer prospects, job loss, nonresponse bias, plant closure, selection bias
Abstract

Studying career outcomes after job loss is challenging because individually displaced worker form a self-selected group. Indeed, the same factors causing the workers to lose their jobs, such as lack of motivation, may also reduce their re-employment prospects. Using data from plant closures where all workers were displaced irrespective of their individual characteristics offers a way around this selection bias. There is no systematic data collection on workers displaced by plant closure in Switzerland. Accordingly, we conducted our own survey on 1200 manufacturing workers who had lost their job 2 years earlier. The analysis of observational data gives rise to a set of methodological challenges, in particular nonresponse bias. Our survey addressed this issue by mixing data collection modes and repeating contact attempts. In addition, we combined the survey data with data from the public unemployment register to examine the extent of nonresponse bias. Our analysis suggests that some of our adjustments helped to reduce bias. Repeated contact attempts increased the response rate, but did not reduce nonresponse bias. In contrast, using telephone interviews in addition to paper questionnaires helped to substantially improve the participation of typically underrepresented subgroups. However, the survey respondents still differ from nonrespondents in terms of age, education and occupation. Interestingly, these differences have no significant impact on the substantial conclusion about displaced workers’ re-employment prospects.

DOI10.1007/978-3-319-24157-9_7
Citation Key2554

Parental and paternity leave proposals in Switzerland: Do they promote gender equality?

TitleParental and paternity leave proposals in Switzerland: Do they promote gender equality?
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2016
AuthorsValarino, I
JournalLIVES Working Papers
Volume2016
Issue53
Pagination1-32
PublisherNCCR LIVES
Keywordsfamily policies, gender equality, parental leave, paternity leave, Switzerland
Abstract

Leave policies are part of the institutional setting that shapes gender relations and parenthood. In Switzerland fathers do not have access to a federal statutory parental or paternity leave. The article analyses the leave policy proposals submitted from 1995 to 2014 by members of the Parliament and their potential implications for gender equality. Content analysis results show that only few proposals – stemming from left-wing political actors – would create incentives for fathers to use these leaves and would therefore promote gender equality. On the contrary, several proposals would produce further gender inequalities, or create inequalities based on social class or citizenship. The article discusses future challenges for leave policy development in Switzerland from a gender equality perspective.

DOI10.12682/lives.2296-1658.2016.53
Citation Key2622

Using dynamic microsimulation to understand professional trajectories of the active Swiss population

TitleUsing dynamic microsimulation to understand professional trajectories of the active Swiss population
Publication TypeBook Chapter
Year of Publication2016
AuthorsAdamopoulos, P, Ritschard, G, Berchtold, A
Book TitleProceedings of the International Conference on Sequence Analysis and Related Methods (LaCOSA II)
Pagination151-154
PublisherNCCR LIVES
Place PublishedLausanne, Switzerland
Keywordslongitudinal data, Markov models, microsimulation, professional trajectories
Abstract

Within the social and economic sciences and of particular interest to demographers are life course events. Looking at life sequences we can better understand which states, or life events, precede or are precursors to vulnerability. A tool that has been used for policy evaluation and recently has been gaining ground in life course sequence simulation is dynamic microsimulation. Within this context dynamic microsimulation consists in generating entire life courses from the observation of portions of the trajectories of individuals of different ages. In this work, we aim to use dynamic microsimulation in order to analyse individual professional trajectories with a focus on vulnerability. The primary goal of this analysis is to deepen upon current literature by providing insight from a longitudinal perspective on the signs of work instability and the process of precarity. The secondary goal of this work which is to show how, by using microsimulation, data collected for one purpose can be analysed under a different scope and used in a meaningful way. The data to be used in this analysis are longitudinal and were collected by NCCR-LIVES IP207 under the supervision of Prof. Christian Maggiori and Dr. Gregoire Bollmann. Individuals aged 25 to 55 residing in the German-speaking and French-speaking regions of Switzerland were followed annually for four years. These individuals were questioned regarding, amongst their personal, professional and overall situations and well-being. At the end of the fourth wave, there were 1131 individuals who had participated in all waves. The sample remained representative of the Swiss population with women and the unemployed slightly over represented. Using the information collected from these surveys, we use simulation to construct various longitudinal data modules where each data module represents a specific life domain. We postulate the relationship between these modules and layout a framework of estimation. Within certain data modules a set of equations are created to model the process therein. For every dynamic (time-variant) data module, such as the labour-market module, the transition probabilities between states (ex. labour market status) are estimated using a Markov model and then the possible outcomes are simulated. The benefit of using dynamic microsimulation is that longitudinal sample observations instead of stylised profiles are used to model population dynamics. This is one of the main reasons large-scale dynamic microsimulation models are employed by many developed nations. There has been limited use, however, of such approaches with Swiss data. This work contributes to the analysis of professional trajectories of the active Swiss population by utilising dynamic microsimulation methods.

URLhttps://lacosa.lives-nccr.ch/sites/lacosa.lives-nccr.ch/files/lacosa2-proceedings.pdf
Citation Key2545
Refereed DesignationRefereed

Proceedings of the International Conference on Sequence Analysis and Related Methods, LaCOSA II

TitleProceedings of the International Conference on Sequence Analysis and Related Methods, LaCOSA II
Publication TypeBook
Year of Publication2016
AuthorsRitschard, G, Studer, M
PublisherNCCR LIVES
Place PublishedLausanne, Switzerland
Keywordssequence analysis
URLhttps://lacosa.lives-nccr.ch/sites/lacosa.lives-nccr.ch/files/lacosa2-proceedings.pdf
Citation Key2546
Refereed DesignationRefereed

Discovering and explaining patterns of work-family reconciliation in Luxembourg

TitleDiscovering and explaining patterns of work-family reconciliation in Luxembourg
Publication TypeBook Chapter
Year of Publication2016
AuthorsZhelyazkova, N, Ritschard, G
Book TitleProceedings of the International Conference on Sequence Analysis and Related Methods (LaCOSA II)
Pagination143-147
PublisherNCCR LIVES
Place PublishedLausanne, Switzerland
URLhttps://lacosa.lives-nccr.ch/sites/lacosa.lives-nccr.ch/files/lacosa2-proceedings.pdf
Citation Key2547
Refereed DesignationRefereed

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