Swiss banking elites: between internationalization and national career patterns

TitleSwiss banking elites: between internationalization and national career patterns
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2015
AuthorsAraujo, P, Bühlmann, F
JournalLIVES Working Papers
Volume2015
Issue35
Pagination1-32
PublisherNCCR LIVES
ISSN2296-1658
Keywordsbanking elites, career, cosmopolitan capital, internationalization, social capital, Switzerland
Abstract

The aim of this paper is to explore how the restructuration of the Swiss banking field over the last four decades has affected the careers of Swiss banking elites. During this period the Swiss banking system has undergone a concentration process, has shifted its activities from retail to investment banking and has been thoroughly internationalized. Inspired by a bourdieusian framework, we examine the impact of these changes on top bankers careers. We conceptualize careers as dynamics of acquisition, accumulation and conversion of different types of capital and investigate different forms of internationality and mobility of top bankers. Using a database of 487 Executive and Non Executive Directors from 37 Swiss banks in 2010 we first perform a sequence analysis to understand different types of international and intersectoral careers. This is then completed by a multiple correspondence analysis which allows us to identify combinations of educational, social and cosmopolitan capital that lead to top positions in different areas of the Swiss banking field. Our findings show that a large part of Swiss bankers still pursue exclusively national careers and that truly international trajectories are limited to a small group of top bankers working in investment banking. These international careers in big banks, foreign banks and stock exchange banks are related to a large amount and particularly international type of educational capital, whereas careers of bank managers with no university education remain restricted to the national space. However, also managers of these regional and cantonal banks tend to imitate the internationality of big banker’s careers. They often spend a brief spell abroad at the beginning of their career or attend a short executive management program in order to give their career an international flavour.

DOI10.12682/lives.2296-1658.2015.35
Citation Key1382

The role of cognitive resources for subjective work ability and health in nursing

TitleThe role of cognitive resources for subjective work ability and health in nursing
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of PublicationIn Press
AuthorsIhle, A, Borella, E, Rahnfeld, M, Müller, SR, Enge, S, Hacker, W, Wegge, J, Oris, M, Kliegel, M
JournalEuropean Journal of Ageing
PaginationAdvance online publication
ISSN1613-9372
Keywordsaging workforce, cognition, nursing, subjective health, subjective work ability
Abstract

Cognitive resources can be considered to be key variables in the context of work ability and health, particularly in the aging workforce. However, research on this issue is sparse, lacking a comprehensive examination of specific cognitive functions. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to examine the association of cognitive resources with subjective work ability and health in more detail. In 166 geriatric care workers (mean age 42.1 years, SD = 11.5, range 20–62), subjective work ability and health were assessed. Additionally, a comprehensive battery of cognitive tests measuring crystallized intelligence, cognitive speed, short-term memory, working memory, and inhibition was administered in a standardized procedure. Controlling for individual differences in age, education, depressive symptoms, self-regulation strategies (in terms of selective optimization with compensation), and cognitive resources (particularly better performance in short-term memory, working memory, and inhibition) were related to better subjective work ability and health. The present results demonstrate the relation of a variety of specific cognitive functions with subjective work ability and health over and above individual differences in age, education, depressive symptoms, and self-regulation strategies. Implications to explicitly consider a set of cognitive resources in models of work and organizational psychology, particularly with respect to the aging workforce, are discussed.

DOI10.1007/s10433-014-0331-y
Citation Key1379
Refereed DesignationRefereed

Quand démocratisation rime avec reproduction: les inégalités sociales dans le système éducatif suisse depuis le début du XXe siècle

TitleQuand démocratisation rime avec reproduction: les inégalités sociales dans le système éducatif suisse depuis le début du XXe siècle
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2015
AuthorsFalcon, J
JournalLIVES Working Papers
Volume2015
Issue34
Pagination1-30
PublisherNCCR LIVES
Place PublishedLausanne
Keywordsdémocratisation du système éducatif, inégalités sociales
Abstract

Cette étude analyse l’évolution de la distribution des inégalités sociales suite à la démocratisation du système éducatif suisse au cours du XXe siècle. Nos analyses, menées à partir de données issues de 21 enquêtes réalisées entre 1972 et 2013, révèlent que, même si la démocratisation scolaire a généré une égalisation de l’accès à l’éducation post-obligatoire, de fortes inégalités sociales subsistent en Suisse. Nous concluons que le système éducatif suisse, caractérisé par de larges filières de formations professionnelles, joue un rôle important dans la persistance de ces inégalités.

DOI10.12682/lives.2296-1658.2015.34
Citation Key1375

Adult age differences in prospective memory in the laboratory: are they related to higher stress levels in the elderly?

TitleAdult age differences in prospective memory in the laboratory: are they related to higher stress levels in the elderly?
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of PublicationIn Press
AuthorsIhle, A, Kliegel, M, Hering, A, Ballhausen, N, Lagner, P, Benusch, J, Cichon, A, Zergiebel, A, Oris, M, Schnitzspahn, KM
JournalFrontiers in Human Neuroscience
PaginationAdvance online publication
Keywordsage differences, laboratory testing situation, prospective memory, relaxation, stress
Abstract

To explain age deficits found in laboratory-based prospective memory (PM) tasks, it has recently been suggested that the testing situation per se may be more stressful for older adults, thereby impairing their performance. To test this assumption, subjective and physiological stress levels were assessed at several times during the experiment in 33 younger and 29 older adults. In addition, half of participants were randomized in a condition where they completed a relaxation intervention before performing a time-based PM task. Results confirmed the age deficit in laboratory PM. Subjective and physiological stress levels showed no age difference and no detrimental association with PM. The intervention successfully reduced stress levels in both age groups but had no effect on PM or the age deficit. In conclusion, data suggest that age deficits usually observed in laboratory PM may not be due to higher stress levels in the older adults.

DOI10.3389/fnhum.2014.01021
Citation Key1373
Refereed DesignationRefereed

Career Adapt-Abilities Scale Short Form (CAAS-SF): Construction and validation

TitleCareer Adapt-Abilities Scale Short Form (CAAS-SF): Construction and validation
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of PublicationIn Press
AuthorsMaggiori, C, Rossier, J, Savickas, ML
JournalJournal of Career Assessment
PaginationAdvance online publication
KeywordsCAAS, career adaptability, confirmatory factor analyses, measurement equivalence, scale validation, short format
Abstract

The Career Adapt-Abilities Scale (CAAS) has become one of the most widely used questionnaires to assess career adaptability. To facilitate its integration into large surveys, in varied settings, the aim of this article was to develop a brief 12-item version, the Career Adapt-Abilities Scale–Short Form (CAAS-SF). A sample of 2,800 French- and German-speaking adults living in Switzerland completed the CAAS. On a first random subsample, a principal component analyses conducted on the CAAS-SF suggested a four-factor solution. A one-to-one association was found between these components and the subscales of the CAAS-SF. Confirmatory factor analyses, conducted on a second random subsample, confirmed the hierarchical factor structure of this short version. Based on Cheung and Rensvold’s criteria, the CAAS-SF reached measurement equivalence across linguistic and gender groups. Furthermore, the 12- and 24-item versions were strongly associated. The results supported the CAAS-SF as pertinent and economical alternative to the 24-item version.

DOI10.1177/1069072714565856
Citation Key1370
Refereed DesignationRefereed

Spell sequences, state proximities and distance metrics

TitleSpell sequences, state proximities and distance metrics
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of PublicationIn Press
AuthorsElzinga, C, Studer, M
JournalSociological Methods & Research
PaginationAdvance online publication
Keywordsduration-weighting, OM, sequence analysis, soft-matching, subsequence
Abstract

Because OM-distance is not very sensitive to differences in the order of events or states, we introduce a subsequence-based distance measure that can be adapted to subsequence length, to subsequence duration and to soft-matching of states or events. Using a simulation technique developed by Studer 2012, we investigate the sensitivity, relative to OM, of several variants of this metric to variations in order, timing and duration of states. The results show that the behavior of the metric is as intended. Furthermore, we use family formation data from the Swiss Household Panel to compare a few variants of the new metric to OM. The new metrics have been implemented in the freely available TraMineR-package.

DOI10.1177/0049124114540707
Citation Key1369
Refereed DesignationRefereed

Improving everyday prospective memory performance in older adults: Comparing cognitive process and strategy training

TitleImproving everyday prospective memory performance in older adults: Comparing cognitive process and strategy training
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2014
AuthorsBrom, S, Kliegel, M
JournalPsychology and Aging
Volume29
Issue3
Pagination744-755
Keywordscognition, elderly, memory, training
Abstract

Considering the importance of prospective memory for independence in old age recently, research has started to examine interventions to reduce prospective memory errors. Two general approaches can be proposed: (a) process training of executive control associated with prospective memory functioning, and/or (b) strategy training to reduce executive task demands. The present study was the first to combine and compare both training methods in a sample of 62 community-dwelling older adults (60–86 years) and to explore their effects on an ecologically valid everyday life prospective memory task (here: regular blood pressure monitoring). Even though the training of executive control was successful in enhancing the trained ability, clear transfer effects on prospective memory performance could only be found for the strategy training. However, participants with low executive abilities benefited particularly from the implementation intention strategy. Conceptually, this supports models suggesting interactions between task demands and individual differences in executive control in explaining individual differences in prospective memory performance.

DOI10.1037/a0037181
Citation Key1368
Refereed DesignationRefereed

Short form of the orientations to happiness questionnaire for the German-speaking countries. Development and analysis of the psychometric properties

TitleShort form of the orientations to happiness questionnaire for the German-speaking countries. Development and analysis of the psychometric properties
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2014
AuthorsRuch, W, Martínez Martí, ML, Heintz, S, Brouwers, S
JournalSwiss Journal of Psychology
Volume73
Issue4
Pagination225-234
Keywordsengagement, meaning, orientations to happiness, pleasure, positive psychology, well-being
Abstract

This paper addresses the development of a 9-item Short Form of the Orientations to Happiness (OTH) Questionnaire (Peterson, Park, & Seligman, 2005) for German-speaking countries. This questionnaire measures three ways to happiness: life of pleasure, life of engagement, and life of meaning. In Experiment 1 (replication sample, N = 1,336), we replicated the three-factor structure found in the 18-item Parent Form. In Experiment 2 (validation sample, N = 222), we again replicated the three-factor structure, which showed a good fit to the data. The coefficients of congruence between the three factors in Experiments 1 and 2 were very high (.94–.98). The correlations between the corresponding scales of the Short and Parent Form were high (.49–.91). The three scales of the Short Form had acceptable internal consistency. The pattern of relationships of both the OTH Short Form and Parent Form with sociodemographic variables, with the endorsement of prototypical behaviors related to the three orientations to happiness, and with meaning in life were very similar for both OTH forms.

DOI10.1024/1421-0185/a000141
Citation Key1367
Refereed DesignationRefereed

Patterns of psychological adaptation to divorce after a long-term marriage

TitlePatterns of psychological adaptation to divorce after a long-term marriage
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of PublicationIn Press
AuthorsPerrig-Chiello, P, Hutchison, S, Morselli, D
JournalJournal of social and personal relationships
Volume2014
PaginationAdvance online publication
Keywordsdivorce, long-term marriage, personality, psychological adaptation, resilience, vulnerability
Abstract

Despite the increase in divorces after a long relationship, this trend remains a neglected research topic. The present contribution seeks to identify patterns of psychological adaptation to divorce after a long-term marriage. Data from a questionnaire study with 308 persons aged 45–65 years, who divorced after having been married for an average of 25 years, are presented. Exploratory latent profile analysis with various well-being outcomes revealed five groups: one with average adapted, one with resilients, and three small groups with seriously affected individuals. Discriminant variables between the groups were personality, time since separation, a new relationship, and financial situation. Age, gender, and length of marriage played a marginal role; satisfaction with the former marriage and initiator status were not relevant.

URLhttp://spr.sagepub.com/content/early/2014/05/07/0265407514533769
DOI10.1177/0265407514533769
Citation Key1366
Refereed DesignationRefereed

"Vivre/Leben/Vivere": An interdisciplinary survey addressing progress and inequalities of aging over the past 30 years in Switzerland

Title"Vivre/Leben/Vivere": An interdisciplinary survey addressing progress and inequalities of aging over the past 30 years in Switzerland
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2014
AuthorsLudwig, C, Cavalli, S, Oris, M
JournalArchives of Gerontology and Geriatrics
Volume59
Issue2
Pagination240-248
Date Published09/2014
Keywordsaging, cross-sectional study, inequalities, life conditions, resources
Abstract

In this paper, we present the rationale and the design of "Vivre/Leben/Vivere" (VLV), a large interdisciplinary survey looking at the life and health conditions of individuals who are aged 65 and older and living in Switzerland. VLV is of the third survey of a repeated cross-sectional study, previously conducted in 1979 and 1994 in two French-speaking areas of Switzerland (the cantons of Geneva and Valais). Launched in 2011, VLV extends the original design to additional German and Italian-speaking areas and targets a sample of 4 200 individuals. Quantitative data are collected by means of two questionnaires and a life history calendar, assessing current resources in multiple spheres of the individuals' life (e.g. household conditions, physical and psychological health, social relations, participation, and values) and their accumulation across the life course. The objectives of VLV are twofold: first it aims to provide an updated view of life and health conditions of the population aged 65 and older in Switzerland, with a major concern in assessing diversity and inequalities. Second, VLV aims to compare these conditions to those observed in 1979 and 1994; hence, it aims providing means to question the sustainability of the positive trends, reported in the previous surveys. VLV is a rare opportunity in Europe to acquire exhaustive and cardinal knowledge about the heterogeneity of the life conditions of the aged and their changes over the past 30 years.

DOI10.1016/j.archger.2014.04.004
Citation Key1365
Refereed DesignationRefereed

Health status and quality of life: results from a national survey in a community-dwelling sample of elderly people

TitleHealth status and quality of life: results from a national survey in a community-dwelling sample of elderly people
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of PublicationIn Press
AuthorsLuthy, C, Cedraschi, C, Allaz, A-F, Herrmann, F, Ludwig, C
JournalQuality of Life Research
PaginationAdvance online publication
Keywordsaging, community-dwelling elderly, health-related quality of life, life conditions
Abstract

Purpose
To investigate the relation between age and HRQoL indicators in a community-dwelling population aged 65 years and older.
Methods
Data were collected within a sample stratified by age (65–69; 70–74; 75–79; 80–84; 85–89; 90 years and above) and sex and randomly selected in the population records in Switzerland. The EQ-5D was used to assess HRQoL. Analyses were conducted on the entire available sample (N = 3,073) and on the subsample with no missing data in the EQ-5D (N = 2,888), considering age, gender, education and region.
Results
Results of multiple regression analyses showed different age-related patterns across the EQ-5D. The proportion of respondents reporting no problems ranged from 51 % in the 65- to 69-year age group to 20 % in the 90 years and above age group. Odds ratio (OR) for Mobility problems increased from 2.04 in the 75- to 79-year age group to 13.34 in the 90 years and above age group; OR for Usual Activities increased from 1.76 to 11.68 and from 1.55 to 2.32 for Pain/Discomfort; OR for Self-Care increased from 5.26 in the 80- to 84-year age group to 30.36 in the 90 years and above age group. Problems with Self-Care remained low, increasing from 6.22 % in the 80- to 84-year age group to 26.21 % in the oldest age group. The magnitude of the gender, region and education effects was much lower than that of age.
Conclusion
HRQoL is globally preserved in older adults in Switzerland, even if substantial impairment is reported in very old age affecting mainly functional health dimensions. Anxiety/Depression and Pain/Discomfort did not appear to be affected by age; high rates of difficulties were reported for Pain/Discomfort but not for Anxiety/Depression.

DOI10.1007/s11136-014-0894-2
Citation Key1364
Refereed DesignationRefereed

A comparative review of sequence dissimilarity measures

TitleA comparative review of sequence dissimilarity measures
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2014
AuthorsStuder, M, Ritschard, G
JournalLIVES Working Papers
Volume2014
Issue33
Pagination1-47
PublisherNCCR LIVES
Place PublishedLausanne
ISSN2296-1658
Keywordsdissimilarity, distance, duration, optimal matching, sequencing, spells, state sequences, timing
Abstract

This is a comparative study of the multiple ways of measuring dissimilarities between state sequences. For sequences describing life courses, such as family life trajectories or professional careers, the important differences between the sequences essentially concern the sequencing (the order in which successive states appear), the timing, and the duration of the spells in the successive states. Even if some distance measures underperform, it has been shown that there is no universally optimal distance index and that the choice of a measure depends on which aspect we want to focus on. This study also introduces novel ways of measuring dissimilarities that overcome the flaws in existing measures.

DOI10.12682/lives.2296-1658.2014.33
Citation Key1320

Le rapport social d'âge dans les politiques sociales

TitleLe rapport social d'âge dans les politiques sociales
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2014
AuthorsTabin, J-P, Perriard, A
Journalrevue ¿Interrogations?
Volume19
Pagination1-12
ISSN1778-3747
Keywordschômage, jeunesse, politique sociale
Abstract

Une catégorie sociale est devenue une cible majeure à la fois du discours politique et de l’intervention sociale: les jeunes sans emploi, ni formation. C’est cette catégorie, généralement utilisée sans interroger le fait qu’elle repose sur un intervalle d’âge qui est l’objet de cet article. Son but est précisément de questionner les présupposés des politiques sociales en direction des jeunes. L’article montre que l’âge est un rapport social et que son usage pour constituer la catégorie «jeune sans emploi, ni formation» comme un problème social a des conséquences sur la manière de penser les problèmes sociaux et les solutions pour les résoudre.

URLhttp://www.revue-interrogations.org/Le-rapport-social-d-age-dans-les
Citation Key1315
Refereed DesignationRefereed

Männer und Männlichkeiten. Disziplinäre Perspektiven

TitleMänner und Männlichkeiten. Disziplinäre Perspektiven
Publication TypeBook
Year of Publication2014
Series EditorJakoby, N, Liebig, B, Peitz, M, Schmid, T, Zinn, I
Series TitleReihe Zürcher Hochschulforum
Number of Pages224
Publishervdf Hochschulverlag
Place PublishedZürich
ISBN Number978-3728135407
Keywordsgender, Männlichkeiten
Citation Key1297

Character strengths and well-being across the life span: Data from a representative sample of German-speaking adults living in Switzerland

TitleCharacter strengths and well-being across the life span: Data from a representative sample of German-speaking adults living in Switzerland
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2014
AuthorsMartínez Martí, ML, Ruch, W
JournalFrontiers in Psychology
Volume5
Number1253
Pagination1-10
Date Published11/2014
Abstract

Character strengths are positive, morally valued traits of personality. This study aims at assessing the relationship between character strengths and subjective well-being (i.e., life satisfaction, positive and negative affect) in a representative sample of German-speaking adults living in Switzerland (N = 945). We further test whether this relationship is consistent at different stages in life. Results showed that hope, zest, love, social intelligence and perseverance yielded the highest positive correlations with life satisfaction. Hope, zest, humor, gratitude and love presented the highest positive correlations with positive affect. Hope, humor, zest, honesty, and open-mindedness had the highest negative correlations with negative affect. When examining the relationship between strengths and well-being across age groups, in general, hope, zest and humor consistently yielded the highest correlations with well-being. Additionally, in the 27-36 years group, strengths that promote commitment and affiliation (i.e., kindness and honesty) were among the first five positions in the ranking of the relationship between strengths and well-being. In the 37-46 years group, in addition to hope, zest and humor, strengths that promote the maintenance of areas such as family and work (i.e., love, leadership) were among the first five positions in the ranking. Finally, in the 47-57 years group, in addition to hope, zest and humor, strengths that facilitate integration and a vital involvement with the environment (i.e., gratitude, love of learning) were among the first five positions in the ranking. This study partially supports previous findings with less representative samples on the association between character strengths and well-being, and sheds light on the relative importance of some strengths over others for well-being across the life span.

DOI10.3389/fpsyg.2014.01253
Citation Key1291
Refereed DesignationRefereed

Cross-fertilizing children’s rights and the capability approach. The example of the right to be heard in organized leisure

TitleCross-fertilizing children’s rights and the capability approach. The example of the right to be heard in organized leisure
Publication TypeBook Chapter
Year of Publication2014
AuthorsStoecklin, D, Bonvin, J-M
EditorStoecklin, D, Bonvin, J-M
Book TitleChildren’s rights and the capability approach. Challenges and prospects
Series TitleChildren’s Well-Being: Indicators and Research
Pagination131-152
PublisherSpringer
Place PublishedDordrecht, Netherlands
ISBN Number978-94-017-9090-1
Abstract

The authors explore new ways of conceptualizing children’s citizenship and participation through the capabilities approach (Sen 1999) applied to children (Biggeri et al. 2011). They highlight factors that must be considered when observing how formal entitlements, such as the rights of the child, can (or cannot) be transformed into real freedom to participate. Their study conducted in Switzerland and in France shows the conditions for the right to be heard (art. 12 UNCRC) to be converted into effective participation in organised leisure activities. The authors identify four sets of factors (economical, political, organisational and personal) that convert or obstruct the child’s entitlement to participate in the definition of organized leisure activities. Two ideal types – bottom-up participation and top-down participation – are built along these lines. The research shows that child participation is mainly induced by professional adults working in youth associations and leisure centres while knowledge of “participation rights” is rather low. Respondents do very seldom use the narrative of “children’s rights” to reflect upon their praxis. This typical line of conduct, or “system of action”, indicates that social relations play a greater role than children’s rights in their subjective evaluation of participatory projects. The study highlights child participation as a sequential process whereby the actor’s reflexivity plays an important role as a converting factor, and thus enriches the theoretical model used in the capabilities approach (Bonvin 2008). The results have important implications for the paradigm of the social actor and contribute to the theory of child participation (Thomas 2007). They underline the instrumental dimension of participation rights as they become real through the exercise of participation itself. The chapter allows for important theoretical and practical developments in the field of child participation, notably by discussing the issue of agency within structure and suggesting a dynamic framework to understand agency as a system of action.

DOI10.1007/978-94-017-9091-8_7
Citation Key1292
Refereed DesignationRefereed

Conclusion

TitleConclusion
Publication TypeBook Chapter
Year of Publication2014
AuthorsStoecklin, D, Bonvin, J-M
EditorStoecklin, D, Bonvin, J-M
Book TitleChildren’s rights and the capability approach. Challenges and prospects
Series TitleChildren’s Well-Being: Indicators and Research
Pagination273-287
PublisherSpringer
Place PublishedDordrecht, Netherlands
ISBN Number978-94-017-9090-1
Citation Key1293
Refereed DesignationRefereed

Children’s rights and the capability approach. Challenges and prospects

TitleChildren’s rights and the capability approach. Challenges and prospects
Publication TypeBook
Year of Publication2014
Series EditorStoecklin, D, Bonvin, J-M
Series TitleChildren’s Well-Being: Indicators and Research
PublisherSpringer
Place PublishedDordrecht, Netherlands
ISBN Number978-94-017-9090-1
Citation Key1294

The theoretical orthodoxy of children’s and youth agency and Its contradictions: Moving from normative thresholds to a situated assessment of children’s and youth lives

TitleThe theoretical orthodoxy of children’s and youth agency and Its contradictions: Moving from normative thresholds to a situated assessment of children’s and youth lives
Publication TypeBook Chapter
Year of Publication2014
AuthorsDahmen, S
EditorStoecklin, D, Bonvin, J-M
Book TitleChildren’s rights and the capability approach. Challenges and prospects
Series TitleChildren’s Well-Being: Indicators and Research
Pagination153-173
PublisherSpringer
Place PublishedDordrecht, Netherlands
ISBN Number978-94-017-9090-1
Abstract

Recent developments within the discussion on children’s rights and in the new sociology of childhood come with a strong focus on children’s agency. They stress their status as a social and political actor, emphasise the need to view children as “beings” rather than “becomings” and highlight children’s autonomy and individuality. This chapter argues that the recent “theoretical orthodoxy” of children’s autonomy may purport an overly optimistic view on children’s agency and neglects inequalities within the space of childhood and youth. It describes the capability approach as a more appropriate approach for analysing inequalities within the space of youth and childhood. It overcomes some of the blind spots described. Particularly, it suggests that the capability approach provides an adequate link between prescriptive treaties (like the UNCRC) and descriptive-analytic approaches (like the sociology of childhood and youth). Based on a research project on transitions from school to work, the article reviews the role of welfare State institutions for the construction of children as social policy objects and for their access to citizenship rights, and analyses differences within the experience of youth that can easily be overlooked by a strong focus on children’s agency. The capability approach is used to develop a tentative framework for a situated assessment of children’s and youth lives. The chapter shortly reviews possible venues of childhood and youth research inspired by the capability approach.

DOI10.1007/978-94-017-9091-8_8
Citation Key1295
Refereed DesignationRefereed

Introduction

TitleIntroduction
Publication TypeBook Chapter
Year of Publication2014
AuthorsBonvin, J-M, Stoecklin, D
EditorStoecklin, D, Bonvin, J-M
Book TitleChildren’s rights and the capability approach. Challenges and prospects
Series TitleChildren’s Well-Being: Indicators and Research
Pagination1-17
PublisherSpringer
Place PublishedDordrecht, Netherlands
ISBN Number978-94-017-9091-1
Abstract

Children’s rights have hardly been analysed in terms of the capability approach (CA), which was developed by Amartya Sen (1999) and Martha Nussbaum (2000), and many other scholars. This book is among the first attempts to bridge the two, and it appears after a few contributions to this endeavour (Biggeri et al. 2010, 2011; Dixon and Nussbaum 2012). Children’s rights and the capability approach are not of the same nature: children’s rights are a social reality and the capability approach is a perspective to reflect on it. The capability approach is a way to operationalize formal freedoms (entitlements), and hence children’s rights. The challenges of applying a capability approach to children's rights include, notably, to go beyond the pitfalls of the new social studies of childhood. The contributions to this book are briefly presented. They highlight important issues that have to be taken into account to approach children's rights in new ways.

DOI10.1007/978-94-017-9091-8_1
Citation Key1296
Refereed DesignationRefereed

Pages